Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals: The VRN-1 connection

Taniya Dhillon, Stephen P. Pearce, Eric J. Stockinger, Assaf Distelfeld, Chengxia Li, Andrea K. Knox, Ildikó Vashegyi, G. Galiba, Attila Vágú, Gabor Galiba, Jorge Dubcovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In winter wheat (Triticum spp.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) varieties, long exposures to nonfreezing cold temperatures accelerate flowering time (vernalization) and improve freezing tolerance (cold acclimation). However, when plants initiate their reproductive development, freezing tolerance decreases, suggesting a connection between the two processes. To better understand this connection, we used two diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) mutants, maintained vegetative phase (mvp), that carry deletions encompassing VRN-1, the major vernalization gene in temperate cereals. Homozygous mvp/mvp plants never flower, whereas plants carrying at least one functional VRN-1 copy (Mvp/2) exhibit normal flowering and high transcript levels of VRN-1 under long days. The Mvp/2 plants showed reduced freezing tolerance and reduced transcript levels of several cold-induced C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR transcription factors and COLD REGULATED genes (COR) relative to the mvp/ mvp plants. Diploid wheat accessions with mutations in the VRN-1 promoter, resulting in high transcript levels under both long and short days, showed a significant down-regulation of COR14b under long days but not under short days. Taken together, these studies suggest that VRN-1 is required for the initiation of the regulatory cascade that down-regulates the cold acclimation pathway but that additional genes regulated by long days are required for the down-regulation of the COR genes. In addition, our results show that allelic variation in VRN-1 is sufficient to determine differences in freezing tolerance, suggesting that quantitative trait loci for freezing tolerance previously mapped on this chromosome region are likely a pleiotropic effect of VRN-1 rather than the effect of a separate closely linked locus (FROST RESISTANCE-1), as proposed in early freezing tolerance studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1846-1858
Number of pages13
JournalPlant Physiology
Volume153
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

cold tolerance
Freezing
Triticum
flowering
Down-Regulation
vernalization
Genes
Acclimatization
Hordeum
Diploidy
genes
acclimation
diploidy
Triticum monococcum
wheat
Quantitative Trait Loci
Hordeum vulgare
winter wheat
Edible Grain
quantitative trait loci

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Genetics
  • Physiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dhillon, T., Pearce, S. P., Stockinger, E. J., Distelfeld, A., Li, C., Knox, A. K., ... Dubcovsky, J. (2010). Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals: The VRN-1 connection. Plant Physiology, 153(4), 1846-1858. https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.110.159079

Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals : The VRN-1 connection. / Dhillon, Taniya; Pearce, Stephen P.; Stockinger, Eric J.; Distelfeld, Assaf; Li, Chengxia; Knox, Andrea K.; Vashegyi, Ildikó; Galiba, G.; Vágú, Attila; Galiba, Gabor; Dubcovsky, Jorge.

In: Plant Physiology, Vol. 153, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 1846-1858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dhillon, T, Pearce, SP, Stockinger, EJ, Distelfeld, A, Li, C, Knox, AK, Vashegyi, I, Galiba, G, Vágú, A, Galiba, G & Dubcovsky, J 2010, 'Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals: The VRN-1 connection', Plant Physiology, vol. 153, no. 4, pp. 1846-1858. https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.110.159079
Dhillon T, Pearce SP, Stockinger EJ, Distelfeld A, Li C, Knox AK et al. Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals: The VRN-1 connection. Plant Physiology. 2010 Aug;153(4):1846-1858. https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.110.159079
Dhillon, Taniya ; Pearce, Stephen P. ; Stockinger, Eric J. ; Distelfeld, Assaf ; Li, Chengxia ; Knox, Andrea K. ; Vashegyi, Ildikó ; Galiba, G. ; Vágú, Attila ; Galiba, Gabor ; Dubcovsky, Jorge. / Regulation of freezing tolerance and flowering in temperate cereals : The VRN-1 connection. In: Plant Physiology. 2010 ; Vol. 153, No. 4. pp. 1846-1858.
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