Regional differences in asphyxia- and reperfusion-induced cytotoxic and vasogenic brain edema formation in newborn pigs

C. Ábrahám, M. Deli, Péter Temesvári, József Kovács, Péter Szerdahelyi, Ferenc Joó, Gérard Torpier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neonatal asphyxia may induce brain injuries. Development of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema was measured in frontal, parietal, occipital cortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus, internal capsule, cerebellum, pons, and medulla of newborn pigs in the following groups: control, asphyxia, and 3-h reperfusion. Water content was significantly (P <0.05) increased in parietal cortex and hippocampus during asphyxia, and in cortical regions, hippocampus, and striatum during recovery. Asphyxia-reperfusion resulted in increased Na+- and Ca2+-, but decreased K+-concentrations in several brain regions. Blood-brain barrier permeability for sodium fluorescein (mw: 376) was significantly increased in all regions but internal capsule and medulla in asphyxia, and in each region during reperfusion. Evan's blue-albumin (mw: 67,000) efflux was unchanged in asphyxia, but significantly increased after reperfusion in all regions. Increased permeability was also demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Edema formation in the early postasphyxial period in porcine brain corresponded to the specific patterns of cerebral damage in human neonates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-182
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience Research Communications
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Asphyxia
Brain Edema
Reperfusion
Swine
Internal Capsule
Hippocampus
Parietal Lobe
Permeability
Edema
Occipital Lobe
Evans Blue
Pons
Brain
Blood-Brain Barrier
Fluorescein
Thalamus
Confocal Microscopy
Brain Injuries
Cerebellum
Albumins

Keywords

  • Asphyxia
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Brain edema
  • Hypoxia-ischemia
  • Newborn

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Regional differences in asphyxia- and reperfusion-induced cytotoxic and vasogenic brain edema formation in newborn pigs. / Ábrahám, C.; Deli, M.; Temesvári, Péter; Kovács, József; Szerdahelyi, Péter; Joó, Ferenc; Torpier, Gérard.

In: Neuroscience Research Communications, Vol. 25, No. 3, 1999, p. 173-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ábrahám, C. ; Deli, M. ; Temesvári, Péter ; Kovács, József ; Szerdahelyi, Péter ; Joó, Ferenc ; Torpier, Gérard. / Regional differences in asphyxia- and reperfusion-induced cytotoxic and vasogenic brain edema formation in newborn pigs. In: Neuroscience Research Communications. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 173-182.
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