Reduced noncovalent connections in leukoaraiosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leukoaraiosis is manifested as diffuse areas of hypodensity on CT scans and as hyperintensity signals on T2-weighted MRI scans. This neuroimaging phenomenon is frequently associated with cognitive decline in the middle-aged or elderly. Ischemic demyelinization or chronic perivascular toxic edema in the white matter of the brain is presumed to be behind this entity. Genetic and environmental factors together lead to the development of leukoaraiosis. The possibility of hypoxia-induced cytoskeleton damage was suggested by recent experimental genetic data. This article discusses the chemical and biochemical consequences of this possibility. It suggests a new approach to leukoaraiosis by linking genetic data, medicinal chemistry, system theory and histopathological data. In accordance with this chemical model, a synchronously evolving slight intracellular ATP depletion along the glial cytoplasm may lead to an unstable biochemical condition in glial cells, which finally predisposes to leukoaraiosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalExpert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Leukoaraiosis
Neuroglia
Chemical Models
Systems Theory
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Poisons
Cytoskeleton
Neuroimaging
Edema
Cytoplasm
Adenosine Triphosphate
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

Keywords

  • ATP
  • Dark cell phenomenon
  • Genetics
  • Kinesin
  • Leukoaraiosis
  • Network
  • Noncovalent connection
  • Water-governed cycle
  • Weak chemical connections
  • White matter hyperintensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Reduced noncovalent connections in leukoaraiosis. / Szolnoki, Z.

In: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, Vol. 8, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 205-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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