Redescription and histopathology of Myxobolus cyprinicola Reuss, 1906, an intestinal parasite of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

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Abstract

Although Myxobolus spores can often be detected from the gut of fish, from the mucus covering the intestinal wall and from the intestinal content, the number of species actually developing in the gut wall is rather low. Myxobolus cyprinicola can be considered a parasite rarely occurring in Europe. This parasite was found to cause infection in the gut of common carp caught from Lake Balaton. Its pinhead-sized plasmodia were located in the lamina propria at the tip of the mucosal folds of the intestine, immediately below the basement membrane. The plasmodia were closely connected with the capillaries of the lamina propria. The large number of red blood cells found between the basement membrane and the plasmodium wall suggests that they started their development in the lumen of a capillary. By their morphological characteristics, the spores of M. cyprinicola are well distinguishable from those of M. cyprini, which more commonly occur in the gut within necrotic macrophages (yellow bodies) after having reached that site as a result of a secondary process. Because of the small size of the plasmodia, the subepithelial location, and the low prevalence and intensity, M. cyprinicola can be considered a less pathogenic species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-283
Number of pages5
JournalActa Protozoologica
Volume41
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Myxobolus
Plasmodium
Carps
redescriptions
Cyprinus carpio
histopathology
Parasites
digestive system
parasites
laminae (animals)
basement membrane
Spores
Basement Membrane
Mucous Membrane
spores
Gastrointestinal Contents
erythrocyte count
Mucus
Lakes
mucus

Keywords

  • Carp
  • Histology
  • Intestine
  • Myxobolus
  • Myxosporea
  • Pisces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Redescription and histopathology of Myxobolus cyprinicola Reuss, 1906, an intestinal parasite of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)",
abstract = "Although Myxobolus spores can often be detected from the gut of fish, from the mucus covering the intestinal wall and from the intestinal content, the number of species actually developing in the gut wall is rather low. Myxobolus cyprinicola can be considered a parasite rarely occurring in Europe. This parasite was found to cause infection in the gut of common carp caught from Lake Balaton. Its pinhead-sized plasmodia were located in the lamina propria at the tip of the mucosal folds of the intestine, immediately below the basement membrane. The plasmodia were closely connected with the capillaries of the lamina propria. The large number of red blood cells found between the basement membrane and the plasmodium wall suggests that they started their development in the lumen of a capillary. By their morphological characteristics, the spores of M. cyprinicola are well distinguishable from those of M. cyprini, which more commonly occur in the gut within necrotic macrophages (yellow bodies) after having reached that site as a result of a secondary process. Because of the small size of the plasmodia, the subepithelial location, and the low prevalence and intensity, M. cyprinicola can be considered a less pathogenic species.",
keywords = "Carp, Histology, Intestine, Myxobolus, Myxosporea, Pisces",
author = "K. Moln{\'a}r",
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AB - Although Myxobolus spores can often be detected from the gut of fish, from the mucus covering the intestinal wall and from the intestinal content, the number of species actually developing in the gut wall is rather low. Myxobolus cyprinicola can be considered a parasite rarely occurring in Europe. This parasite was found to cause infection in the gut of common carp caught from Lake Balaton. Its pinhead-sized plasmodia were located in the lamina propria at the tip of the mucosal folds of the intestine, immediately below the basement membrane. The plasmodia were closely connected with the capillaries of the lamina propria. The large number of red blood cells found between the basement membrane and the plasmodium wall suggests that they started their development in the lumen of a capillary. By their morphological characteristics, the spores of M. cyprinicola are well distinguishable from those of M. cyprini, which more commonly occur in the gut within necrotic macrophages (yellow bodies) after having reached that site as a result of a secondary process. Because of the small size of the plasmodia, the subepithelial location, and the low prevalence and intensity, M. cyprinicola can be considered a less pathogenic species.

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