Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Obesity associated hormonal disorders mediate increased breast cancer risk during the whole life of women without any ambiguous interaction between obesity and menopausal status. Erroneous results regarding the breast cancer protective impact of obesity in young women derive mainly from the deceivingly lower tumor incidence among them as compared with obese postmenopausal cases. Obesity is typically associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone production and ovulatory cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. Literary data support that anovulatory infertility and nulliparity are strong risk factors for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. Circulating estrogen level may be the pivotal regulator in mediating differences in adipose tissue distribution between pre- and postmenopausal women. In obese premenopausal women, female-like, gluteofemoral, subcutaneous fat deposition is typical and there is a low incidence of obesity associated dysmetabolism and sexual hormone imbalance in these cases. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen level, which may be protective against breast cancer risk in young females. By contrast, in obese postmenopausal cases, circulating estrogen levels are dramatically decreased and the adipose tissue distribution becomes more male-like, viscerally deposited, presenting a strong risk factor for dysmetabolism and breast cancer. In obese postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) decreases the risk of breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen substitution may counteract obesity related systemic alterations. Recognition of inverse correlation between circulating estrogen levels and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRecent Avenue to Cancer Prevention
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages59-86
Number of pages28
ISBN (Print)9781629487120, 9781629486703
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Estrogens
Obesity
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Tissue Distribution
Adipose Tissue
Hormones
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Subcutaneous Fat
Incidence
Primary Prevention
Parity
Infertility
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Suba, Z. (2014). Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer. In Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention (pp. 59-86). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer. / Suba, Z.

Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. p. 59-86.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Suba, Z 2014, Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer. in Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 59-86.
Suba Z. Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer. In Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2014. p. 59-86
Suba, Z. / Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer. Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2014. pp. 59-86
@inbook{0fb768534c2c47d787e3536c29749649,
title = "Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer",
abstract = "Obesity associated hormonal disorders mediate increased breast cancer risk during the whole life of women without any ambiguous interaction between obesity and menopausal status. Erroneous results regarding the breast cancer protective impact of obesity in young women derive mainly from the deceivingly lower tumor incidence among them as compared with obese postmenopausal cases. Obesity is typically associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone production and ovulatory cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. Literary data support that anovulatory infertility and nulliparity are strong risk factors for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. Circulating estrogen level may be the pivotal regulator in mediating differences in adipose tissue distribution between pre- and postmenopausal women. In obese premenopausal women, female-like, gluteofemoral, subcutaneous fat deposition is typical and there is a low incidence of obesity associated dysmetabolism and sexual hormone imbalance in these cases. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen level, which may be protective against breast cancer risk in young females. By contrast, in obese postmenopausal cases, circulating estrogen levels are dramatically decreased and the adipose tissue distribution becomes more male-like, viscerally deposited, presenting a strong risk factor for dysmetabolism and breast cancer. In obese postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) decreases the risk of breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen substitution may counteract obesity related systemic alterations. Recognition of inverse correlation between circulating estrogen levels and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures.",
author = "Z. Suba",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781629487120",
pages = "59--86",
booktitle = "Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention",
publisher = "Nova Science Publishers, Inc.",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Recovery of estrogen level in obese women is preventive against cancer

AU - Suba, Z.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Obesity associated hormonal disorders mediate increased breast cancer risk during the whole life of women without any ambiguous interaction between obesity and menopausal status. Erroneous results regarding the breast cancer protective impact of obesity in young women derive mainly from the deceivingly lower tumor incidence among them as compared with obese postmenopausal cases. Obesity is typically associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone production and ovulatory cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. Literary data support that anovulatory infertility and nulliparity are strong risk factors for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. Circulating estrogen level may be the pivotal regulator in mediating differences in adipose tissue distribution between pre- and postmenopausal women. In obese premenopausal women, female-like, gluteofemoral, subcutaneous fat deposition is typical and there is a low incidence of obesity associated dysmetabolism and sexual hormone imbalance in these cases. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen level, which may be protective against breast cancer risk in young females. By contrast, in obese postmenopausal cases, circulating estrogen levels are dramatically decreased and the adipose tissue distribution becomes more male-like, viscerally deposited, presenting a strong risk factor for dysmetabolism and breast cancer. In obese postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) decreases the risk of breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen substitution may counteract obesity related systemic alterations. Recognition of inverse correlation between circulating estrogen levels and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures.

AB - Obesity associated hormonal disorders mediate increased breast cancer risk during the whole life of women without any ambiguous interaction between obesity and menopausal status. Erroneous results regarding the breast cancer protective impact of obesity in young women derive mainly from the deceivingly lower tumor incidence among them as compared with obese postmenopausal cases. Obesity is typically associated with dysmetabolism and endangers the healthy equilibrium of sexual hormone production and ovulatory cycles in women, which are the prerequisites not only for reproductive capacity but also for somatic health. Literary data support that anovulatory infertility and nulliparity are strong risk factors for breast cancer in young women either with or without obesity. Circulating estrogen level may be the pivotal regulator in mediating differences in adipose tissue distribution between pre- and postmenopausal women. In obese premenopausal women, female-like, gluteofemoral, subcutaneous fat deposition is typical and there is a low incidence of obesity associated dysmetabolism and sexual hormone imbalance in these cases. Consequently, it is not obesity but rather the still sufficient estrogen level, which may be protective against breast cancer risk in young females. By contrast, in obese postmenopausal cases, circulating estrogen levels are dramatically decreased and the adipose tissue distribution becomes more male-like, viscerally deposited, presenting a strong risk factor for dysmetabolism and breast cancer. In obese postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) decreases the risk of breast cancer as the protective effect of estrogen substitution may counteract obesity related systemic alterations. Recognition of inverse correlation between circulating estrogen levels and breast cancer risk in obese women should advance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and promotes primary prevention measures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84954342073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84954342073&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84954342073

SN - 9781629487120

SN - 9781629486703

SP - 59

EP - 86

BT - Recent Avenue to Cancer Prevention

PB - Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

ER -