Recent advances in understanding of vanilloid receptors: A therapeutic target for treatment of pain and inflammation in skin

T. Bíró, Gcza Acs, Peter Acs, Shayan Modarres, Peter M. Blumberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

C-fiber sensory afferent neurons, which contain neuropeptides such as calcitonin-gene related peptide and substance P, mediate a wide variety of physiologic responses, including chemogenic pain, thermoregulation, and neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin, the pungent constituent in red pepper, functions to activate and then, at higher doses and longer times, desensitize this class of neurons. This latter response provides the basis for the therapeutic application of capsaicin. A major advance in the field has been the identification of resiniferatoxin, a phorbol-related diterpene, as an analog of capsaicin that is ultrapotent but with differential selectivity. In particular, resiniferatoxin is only similar in potency for induction of pain but is much more effective for desensitization. Structure-activity analysis in whole animal experiments provides further evidence for dissociation of biologic endpoints, strongly arguing for the existence of vanilloid receptor subclasses. Using resiniferatoxin, we have been able to define specific, high-affinity receptors for capsaicin both in animal models such as rats and in man. Of great importance, the pharmacologic characterization in cultured dorsal root ganglion cells of the high-affinity resiniferatoxin-binding site and of the physiologic response believed to be directly coupled to the receptor, viz. calcium uptake, differed in structure-activity and in cooperativity. We conclude that multiple high-affinity vanilloid receptor subclasses mediate vanilloid response; moreover, the resiniferatoxin- selective subclass of vanilloid receptors is not the voltage-independent, cation-nonselective ion channel as previously believed. Optimization of ligands for the individual vanilloid receptor subclasses should revolutionize this therapeutic area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-60
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Fingerprint

TRPV Cation Channels
Capsaicin
Inflammation
Pain
Skin
Neurogenic Inflammation
Therapeutics
Afferent Neurons
Capsicum
Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Body Temperature Regulation
Diterpenes
Spinal Ganglia
Sensory Receptor Cells
Substance P
Neuropeptides
Ion Channels
Cations
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Capsaicin
  • Resiniferatoxin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Recent advances in understanding of vanilloid receptors : A therapeutic target for treatment of pain and inflammation in skin. / Bíró, T.; Acs, Gcza; Acs, Peter; Modarres, Shayan; Blumberg, Peter M.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1997, p. 56-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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