Railway-facilitated dispersal of the Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis) during its current range expansion in the Pannonian basin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sparrows (Passer spp.) have long been presumed to rely on railway traffic during their long-distance terrestrial dispersion. The currently ongoing range expansions of the Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis) and the Red-rumped Swallow (Hirundo daurica) in Central Europe provide an opportunity to develop this idea into a testable hypothesis. Both species are small, synanthropic passerines but the latter one is highly aerial and mobile. Therefore, Red-rumped Swallows are not supposed to rely on railways for spatial dispersion so that their distance from railway lines is supposed to reflect observers’ distribution, but not otherwise influenced by railway proximity. I have analyzed published data from Hungary and North Serbia (Vojvodina, except for its South Banat District) from 2000 onward. During this period, both species exhibited a slow northward range expansion on the Southern edge of the study area but have not yet established self-sustaining populations. Vagrant individuals of the Spanish Sparrow and its hybrid Italian Sparrow (Passer italiae) occurred significantly closer (N = 8, range = 0.01–3.36 km) to railway lines than vagrant Red-rumped Swallows (N = 23, range = 0.45–13.76 km). This constitutes an empirical evidence supporting the idea that sparrows tend to rely on railway traffic for long-distance dispersion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-473
Number of pages5
JournalBioInvasions Records
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2018

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Passer
Passeriformes
railroads
range expansion
railway
basins
basin
traffic
Hirundo
Serbia
passerine
Central European region
Hungary

Keywords

  • Freight trains
  • Human facilitated dispersal
  • Passeriformes
  • Railway
  • Synanthropic birds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

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title = "Railway-facilitated dispersal of the Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis) during its current range expansion in the Pannonian basin",
abstract = "Sparrows (Passer spp.) have long been presumed to rely on railway traffic during their long-distance terrestrial dispersion. The currently ongoing range expansions of the Spanish Sparrow (Passer hispaniolensis) and the Red-rumped Swallow (Hirundo daurica) in Central Europe provide an opportunity to develop this idea into a testable hypothesis. Both species are small, synanthropic passerines but the latter one is highly aerial and mobile. Therefore, Red-rumped Swallows are not supposed to rely on railways for spatial dispersion so that their distance from railway lines is supposed to reflect observers’ distribution, but not otherwise influenced by railway proximity. I have analyzed published data from Hungary and North Serbia (Vojvodina, except for its South Banat District) from 2000 onward. During this period, both species exhibited a slow northward range expansion on the Southern edge of the study area but have not yet established self-sustaining populations. Vagrant individuals of the Spanish Sparrow and its hybrid Italian Sparrow (Passer italiae) occurred significantly closer (N = 8, range = 0.01–3.36 km) to railway lines than vagrant Red-rumped Swallows (N = 23, range = 0.45–13.76 km). This constitutes an empirical evidence supporting the idea that sparrows tend to rely on railway traffic for long-distance dispersion.",
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