Ragweed in eastern Europe

L. Makra, István Matyasovszky, Áron József Deák

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ambrosia artemisiifolia, common ragweed, is an invasive plant species whose introduction and spread in Eastern Europe has resulted in enormous environmental and economic losses in agriculture and public health in recent decades. Th e aim of this chapter is: (i) to provide an overview on the origin and distribution of Ambrosia from North America to Europe, with special focus on Eastern Europe, particularly Hungary; and (ii) to identify and quantify those humanrelated factors on either a regional or global basis that may act to facilitate the spread and pollen production of this plant species. Th e chapter shows that socio-economic changes, particularly in agriculture following the fall of the Soviet Union, may be factors in contributing to the degree of soil disturbance necessary for ragweed establishment and spread. In addition, a temporal analysis is conducted of ragweed pollen characteristics and local meteorological factors from Szeged, Hungary (located in the biogeographical region of Hungary with the highest recorded ragweed pollen counts). Th is analysis demonstrates that most of the A. artemisiifolia pollen is from local (

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInvasive Species and Global Climate Change
PublisherCABI International
Pages117-128
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781780641645
Publication statusPublished - Aug 29 2014

Fingerprint

pollen
biogeographical region
agriculture
temporal analysis
public health
disturbance
Eastern Europe
economics
soil
plant species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., & Deák, Á. J. (2014). Ragweed in eastern Europe. In Invasive Species and Global Climate Change (pp. 117-128). CABI International.

Ragweed in eastern Europe. / Makra, L.; Matyasovszky, István; Deák, Áron József.

Invasive Species and Global Climate Change. CABI International, 2014. p. 117-128.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Makra, L, Matyasovszky, I & Deák, ÁJ 2014, Ragweed in eastern Europe. in Invasive Species and Global Climate Change. CABI International, pp. 117-128.
Makra L, Matyasovszky I, Deák ÁJ. Ragweed in eastern Europe. In Invasive Species and Global Climate Change. CABI International. 2014. p. 117-128
Makra, L. ; Matyasovszky, István ; Deák, Áron József. / Ragweed in eastern Europe. Invasive Species and Global Climate Change. CABI International, 2014. pp. 117-128
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