Sugárterápia és emló-helyreállító mútét: az összeférhetóség kérdése.

Translated title of the contribution: Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: the issue of compatibility

J. Fodor, Gusztáv Gulyás, C. Polgár, T. Major, M. Kásler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Breast reconstruction after mastectomy represents an improvement in the quality of life of breast cancer patients. Radiotherapy is also suggested for many of them to prevent local relapse. However, irradiation increases the risk of complications require surgical procedures. PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to analyse the compatibility of breast reconstruction and irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS: Computerised searches for publications debating this issue were done of MEDLINE data. Studies were grouped according to the techniques and types of reconstruction: reconstruction with silicone implant or autogenous skin-muscle flap, timing of reconstruction (immediate or delayed), and sequencing of treatments (pre- or post-reconstruction irradiation). The results of studies were assessed and compared in respect to reconstruction related chronic complications. RESULTS: The incidence of complications was significant even in the absence of irradiation, but radiotherapy increased the risk of complications to less or more extent. When reconstruction was done with implant, the most common type of complication was Grade III-IV capsular contracture. In patients subjected to immediate reconstruction, the complication rates with or without radiotherapy were from 0% to 64% and from 0% to 12%, respectively. In women who underwent delayed reconstruction, the incidence of complications with or without irradiation was from 22% to 55%, and from 17% to 34%, respectively. The negative effect of radiotherapy was more significant with immediate than with delayed reconstruction. In patients who underwent reconstruction with skin-muscle flaps, the most common type of complication was skin necrosis. The incidence of complications with or without radiotherapy was from 12% to 39% and from 5% to 25%, respectively. Cancer, developing after cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty in the breast, can be treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy without removal of the implant. In series with this method of treatment the incidence of complications (mainly capsular contracture) was from 0% to 65%. The use of moderate dose (45-50 Gy), wedge filters, and no use of bolus application decreased the risk of complications. CONCLUSIONS: Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction are not incompatible, but careful consideration of their relative timing and technique is important. Plastic surgeons should counsel patients before starting their cancer disease treatment, and those who choose to have reconstruction need to be informed about risks for specific complications associated with the procedure. Results of the studies debating this issue are controversial. Longer follow-up time, larger patient material and better specified parameters are needed to validate results.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)549-555
Number of pages7
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume144
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Mar 23 2003

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Mammaplasty
Radiotherapy
Incidence
Contracture
Skin
Breast Neoplasms
Muscles
Segmental Mastectomy
Mastectomy
Silicones
Therapeutics
MEDLINE
Cosmetics
Publications
Neoplasms
Breast
Necrosis
Quality of Life
Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sugárterápia és emló-helyreállító mútét : az összeférhetóség kérdése. / Fodor, J.; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Polgár, C.; Major, T.; Kásler, M.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 144, No. 12, 23.03.2003, p. 549-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Sug{\'a}rter{\'a}pia {\'e}s eml{\'o}-helyre{\'a}ll{\'i}t{\'o} m{\'u}t{\'e}t: az {\"o}sszef{\'e}rhet{\'o}s{\'e}g k{\'e}rd{\'e}se.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Breast reconstruction after mastectomy represents an improvement in the quality of life of breast cancer patients. Radiotherapy is also suggested for many of them to prevent local relapse. However, irradiation increases the risk of complications require surgical procedures. PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to analyse the compatibility of breast reconstruction and irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS: Computerised searches for publications debating this issue were done of MEDLINE data. Studies were grouped according to the techniques and types of reconstruction: reconstruction with silicone implant or autogenous skin-muscle flap, timing of reconstruction (immediate or delayed), and sequencing of treatments (pre- or post-reconstruction irradiation). The results of studies were assessed and compared in respect to reconstruction related chronic complications. RESULTS: The incidence of complications was significant even in the absence of irradiation, but radiotherapy increased the risk of complications to less or more extent. When reconstruction was done with implant, the most common type of complication was Grade III-IV capsular contracture. In patients subjected to immediate reconstruction, the complication rates with or without radiotherapy were from 0{\%} to 64{\%} and from 0{\%} to 12{\%}, respectively. In women who underwent delayed reconstruction, the incidence of complications with or without irradiation was from 22{\%} to 55{\%}, and from 17{\%} to 34{\%}, respectively. The negative effect of radiotherapy was more significant with immediate than with delayed reconstruction. In patients who underwent reconstruction with skin-muscle flaps, the most common type of complication was skin necrosis. The incidence of complications with or without radiotherapy was from 12{\%} to 39{\%} and from 5{\%} to 25{\%}, respectively. Cancer, developing after cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty in the breast, can be treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy without removal of the implant. In series with this method of treatment the incidence of complications (mainly capsular contracture) was from 0{\%} to 65{\%}. The use of moderate dose (45-50 Gy), wedge filters, and no use of bolus application decreased the risk of complications. CONCLUSIONS: Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction are not incompatible, but careful consideration of their relative timing and technique is important. Plastic surgeons should counsel patients before starting their cancer disease treatment, and those who choose to have reconstruction need to be informed about risks for specific complications associated with the procedure. Results of the studies debating this issue are controversial. Longer follow-up time, larger patient material and better specified parameters are needed to validate results.",
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AU - Gulyás, Gusztáv

AU - Polgár, C.

AU - Major, T.

AU - Kásler, M.

PY - 2003/3/23

Y1 - 2003/3/23

N2 - BACKGROUND: Breast reconstruction after mastectomy represents an improvement in the quality of life of breast cancer patients. Radiotherapy is also suggested for many of them to prevent local relapse. However, irradiation increases the risk of complications require surgical procedures. PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to analyse the compatibility of breast reconstruction and irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer. METHODS: Computerised searches for publications debating this issue were done of MEDLINE data. Studies were grouped according to the techniques and types of reconstruction: reconstruction with silicone implant or autogenous skin-muscle flap, timing of reconstruction (immediate or delayed), and sequencing of treatments (pre- or post-reconstruction irradiation). The results of studies were assessed and compared in respect to reconstruction related chronic complications. RESULTS: The incidence of complications was significant even in the absence of irradiation, but radiotherapy increased the risk of complications to less or more extent. When reconstruction was done with implant, the most common type of complication was Grade III-IV capsular contracture. In patients subjected to immediate reconstruction, the complication rates with or without radiotherapy were from 0% to 64% and from 0% to 12%, respectively. In women who underwent delayed reconstruction, the incidence of complications with or without irradiation was from 22% to 55%, and from 17% to 34%, respectively. The negative effect of radiotherapy was more significant with immediate than with delayed reconstruction. In patients who underwent reconstruction with skin-muscle flaps, the most common type of complication was skin necrosis. The incidence of complications with or without radiotherapy was from 12% to 39% and from 5% to 25%, respectively. Cancer, developing after cosmetic augmentation mammaplasty in the breast, can be treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy without removal of the implant. In series with this method of treatment the incidence of complications (mainly capsular contracture) was from 0% to 65%. The use of moderate dose (45-50 Gy), wedge filters, and no use of bolus application decreased the risk of complications. CONCLUSIONS: Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction are not incompatible, but careful consideration of their relative timing and technique is important. Plastic surgeons should counsel patients before starting their cancer disease treatment, and those who choose to have reconstruction need to be informed about risks for specific complications associated with the procedure. Results of the studies debating this issue are controversial. Longer follow-up time, larger patient material and better specified parameters are needed to validate results.

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