A baktériumok "quorum sensing" szignálmechanizmusai: Irodalmi áttekintés

Translated title of the contribution: "Quorum Sensing" Signal mechanisms of bacteria. Review

Nógrády Noémi, Paul A. Barrow, B. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

"Quorum sensing" (QS) signal mechanisms represent special forms of interbacterial actions which make the sensing of cell density of a given bacterial population possible and which will - independently from the available nutrient - inhibit bacterial growth of the culture above a certain tolerable limit. Examples of QS mechanisms of streptococci, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis are briefly mentioned. The acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) signal and receptor systems, frequently encountered in Gram negative bacteria are reviewed: details are given on the AHL signalpeptids and corresponding receptors of the marine vibrios (Vibrio barveyi and V. fischeri) regulated by the luxs and luxr genes respectively. The "quorum sensing" system of Pseudomonas aernginosa is more complex: containing a special Pseudomonas quinolon signal (PQS), and other small diffusible molecules, besides AHL. A separate chapter is devoted to the interbacterial communication mechanisms of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Beside the known colicin (and bacteriocin) systems these are also containing the production of inhibitory molecules regulated by the sdia and lux genes. These (and other similar) mechanisms result inhibition of intestinal colonization (in vivo), and the growth inhibition (in vitro). Significance of these mechanisms in science and technology is pointed out.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)682-688
Number of pages7
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume122
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Acyl-Butyrolactones
homoserine
Quorum Sensing
quorum sensing
lactones
Vibrio
Pseudomonas
Bacteria
bacteria
colicins
Vibrio fischeri
Colicins
Bacteriocins
receptors
Enterococcus faecalis
Streptococcus
bacteriocins
Growth
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Gram-negative bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

A baktériumok "quorum sensing" szignálmechanizmusai : Irodalmi áttekintés. / Noémi, Nógrády; Barrow, Paul A.; Nagy, B.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 122, No. 11, 2000, p. 682-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Noémi, Nógrády ; Barrow, Paul A. ; Nagy, B. / A baktériumok "quorum sensing" szignálmechanizmusai : Irodalmi áttekintés. In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2000 ; Vol. 122, No. 11. pp. 682-688.
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