Pulsed-flow microcalorimetric study of the template-monolayer region of nonionic surfactants adsorbed at the graphite/water interface

Z. Király, Gerhard H. Findenegg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The formation of half-cylindrical surfactant aggregates at the graphite/aqueous solution interface is templated by an ordered monolayer of molecules disposed parallel to the graphite basal plane. Beyond a critical alkyl chain length, monolayer formation is effectively irreversible. Since enthalpic interactions in this template-monolayer region cannot be resolved with adequate accuracy by the traditional adsorption calorimetric methods, we applied a novel method, pulsed-flow calorimetry, for simultaneous measurement of the material balance and the enthalpy balance in this high-affinity region. For the three nonionic surfactants studied, n-octyl β-D-glucoside (C8G 1), dimethyl-n-decylamine oxide (C10DAO), and n-octyl tetraethylene glycol monoether (C8E4), the adsorption was found to be strongly exothermic and effectively irreversible at low adsorbate densities, and the differential heat of adsorption markedly decreased with increasing surface coverage in this region. This deviation from the ideal adsorption behavior was attributed to intermolecular interactions within the adsorption layer rather than to surface heterogeneity of the graphite basal planes. A thermodynamic consistency test clearly demonstrated that pulsed-flow calorimetry is a unique experimental method for the study of nonreversible adsorption phenomena at solid/solution interfaces, representing an excellent tool to complement traditional methods, e.g., frontal-flow and titration adsorption calorimetry. Studies by the frontal-flow method revealed that aggregation on top of the surfactant monolayer was endothermic and reversible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5047-5054
Number of pages8
JournalLangmuir
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 24 2005

Fingerprint

Pulsatile flow
Graphite
Nonionic surfactants
Monolayers
templates
graphite
surfactants
Adsorption
adsorption
Water
water
Calorimetry
heat measurement
Surface-Active Agents
Surface active agents
material balance
glucosides
Glycols
Glucosides
Adsorbates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Pulsed-flow microcalorimetric study of the template-monolayer region of nonionic surfactants adsorbed at the graphite/water interface. / Király, Z.; Findenegg, Gerhard H.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 21, No. 11, 24.05.2005, p. 5047-5054.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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