Psychosocial variables are associated with being wait-listed, but not with receiving a kidney transplant in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS).

L. Szeifert, Jennifer L. Bragg-Gresham, Jyothi Thumma, Brenda W. Gillespie, I. Mucsi, Bruce M. Robinson, Ronald L. Pisoni, Alex Disney, Christian Combe, Friedrich K. Port

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Psychosocial factors are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease. It is not known if self-reported depression and quality of life influence the likelihood of being wait-listed and receiving a transplant. Prevalent cross section of 18- to 65-year-old hemodialysis (HD) patients in the USA (N = 2033) and seven European countries (N = 4350) from the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study phase II and III was analyzed. Wait-listed patients (N = 1838) were followed until kidney transplantation. Self-reported depressive symptoms were assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale, 10-item version (CES-D) and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 12 scale Physical Component Score (PCS). At study entry, 27% (USA) to 53% (UK) of patients were wait-listed in participating countries. Variables associated with lower odds of being on the waiting list included worse HR-QoL, more severe depressive symptoms, older age, fewer years of education, lower serum albumin, lower hemoglobin, shorter time on dialysis and presence of multiple comorbid conditions. Among wait-listed patients, significantly lower transplantation rates were seen for females, blacks, patients having prior transplantation and multiple comorbid conditions but not PCS or CES-D. Fewer depressive symptoms and better HR-QoL are associated with being on the waiting list in prevalent HD patients but not with receiving a kidney transplant among wait-listed dialysis patients. Regular assessment of subjective well-being may help identify patients with reduced access to wait-listing and kidney transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2107-2113
Number of pages7
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume27
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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Dialysis
Transplants
Kidney
Quality of Life
Depression
Waiting Lists
Kidney Transplantation
Renal Dialysis
Transplantation
Kidney Diseases
Serum Albumin
Chronic Kidney Failure
Epidemiologic Studies
Hemoglobins
Psychology
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Psychosocial variables are associated with being wait-listed, but not with receiving a kidney transplant in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS). / Szeifert, L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Thumma, Jyothi; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Mucsi, I.; Robinson, Bruce M.; Pisoni, Ronald L.; Disney, Alex; Combe, Christian; Port, Friedrich K.

In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 27, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 2107-2113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szeifert, L. ; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. ; Thumma, Jyothi ; Gillespie, Brenda W. ; Mucsi, I. ; Robinson, Bruce M. ; Pisoni, Ronald L. ; Disney, Alex ; Combe, Christian ; Port, Friedrich K. / Psychosocial variables are associated with being wait-listed, but not with receiving a kidney transplant in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS). In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 2107-2113.
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