Psoriasis and alcohol: Is cutaneous ethanol one of the missing links?

Á Farkas, L. Kemény

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many exogenous factors including excessive alcohol consumption have been associated with psoriasis, but the underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. Drinking worsens therapeutic compliance, and decreases the efficacy and increases the toxicity of systemic antipsoriatic treatments. Excess alcohol intake results in compromised immunity and increased risk of infections, but alcohol can induce proinflammatory cytokine production in various cell types and can increase mitogen-derived lymphocyte proliferation and lymphocyte activation. As we have previously reported, alcohol and one of its metabolites, acetone, induce keratinocyte proliferation and increase the mRNA levels of genes characteristic for proliferating keratinocytes, such as α5 integrin, cyclin D1 and keratinocyte growth factor receptor. Recently the correlation between blood and skin ethanol levels in humans was determined by a transdermal alcohol monitoring device, against the 'gold standard' breath alcohol readings. Based on transdermal alcohol measurements it can be concluded that cutaneous alcohol concentrations can reach levels that induce proinflammatory cytokine production and lymphocyte and keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. It is expected that the development of methodologies measuring transdermal ethanol will provide additional tools to evaluate how alcohol influences skin physiology and different dermatological conditions including psoriasis. Our review focuses on the possible link between alcohol misuse and psoriasis, particularly on the possible role of cutaneous ethanol in precipitating the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)711-716
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Volume162
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Psoriasis
Ethanol
Alcohols
Skin
Keratinocytes
Skin Physiological Phenomena
Lymphocytes
Cytokines
Cyclin D1
Lymphocyte Activation
Acetone
Mitogens
Integrins
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Reading
Immunity
Equipment and Supplies
Messenger RNA
Infection

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Cutaneous ethanol concentration
  • Keratinocyte
  • Lymphocyte
  • Psoriasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Psoriasis and alcohol : Is cutaneous ethanol one of the missing links? / Farkas, Á; Kemény, L.

In: British Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 162, No. 4, 2010, p. 711-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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