Protochlorophyll complexes with similar steady-state fluorescence characteristics can differ in fluorescence lifetimes. A model study in Triton X-100

Beata Myśliwa-Kurdziel, K. Solymosi, Jerzy Kruk, B. Böddi, Kazimierz Strzałka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of protochlorophyll (Pchl) dissolved in neat Triton X-100 and in Triton X-100 micelles were investigated, and the fluorescence lifetimes of different Pchl spectral forms were studied. Varying the concentration of Pchl or diluting the micellar solutions either with a buffer or with a micellar solution, 631-634, 645-655, 680-692 and above 700 nm emitting Pchl complexes were prepared, the ratios of which varied from one another. The fluorescence decay of the 631-634 nm emitting (monomeric) form had a mono-exponential character with a 5.4-ns fluorescence lifetime. The long-wavelength Pchl complexes (aggregates) had two fluorescence lifetime values within a range of 1.4-3.9 ns and 0.15-0.84 ns, which showed high variability in different environments. Depending on the conditions, either mono- or double-exponential fluorescence decay was found for a fluorescence band at 680-685 nm. These data show that despite their very similar steady-state fluorescence properties, Pchl complexes can differ in fluorescence lifetimes, which may reflect different molecular structures, intrinsic geometries or different molecular interactions. This underlines the importance of complex spectroscopic analysis for a precise description of native and artificial chlorophyllous pigment forms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-271
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

protochlorophyll
Octoxynol
Fluorescence
fluorescence
life (durability)
deterioration
octoxynol
Spectroscopic analysis
Molecular interactions
spectroscopic analysis
Micelles
micelles
decay
molecular interactions
pigments
Molecular Structure
Pigments
chemical structure
Molecular structure
wavelengths

Keywords

  • Fluorescence emission spectra
  • Fluorescence lifetime
  • Micelles
  • Protochlorophyll
  • Protochlorophyll aggregation
  • Triton X-100

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Bioengineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Protochlorophyll complexes with similar steady-state fluorescence characteristics can differ in fluorescence lifetimes. A model study in Triton X-100. / Myśliwa-Kurdziel, Beata; Solymosi, K.; Kruk, Jerzy; Böddi, B.; Strzałka, Kazimierz.

In: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology, B: Biology, Vol. 86, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 262-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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