Proteins without 3D structure: Definition, detection and beyond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motivation: Predictions, and experiments to a lesser extent, following the decoding of the human genome showed that a significant fraction of gene products do not have well-defined 3D structures. While the presence of structured domains traditionally suggested function, it was not clear what the absence of structure implied. These and many other findings initiated the extensive theoretical and experimental research into these types of proteins, commonly known as intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Crucial to understanding IDPs is the evaluation of structural predictors based on different principles and trained on various datasets, which is currently the subject of active research. The view is emerging that structural disorder can be considered as a separate structural category and not simply as absence of secondary and/or tertiary structure. IDPs perform essential functions and their improper functioning is responsible for human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbtr175
Pages (from-to)1449-1454
Number of pages6
JournalBioinformatics
Volume27
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Intrinsically Disordered Proteins
Proteins
Protein
Genes
Disorder
Human Genome
Research
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Decoding
Well-defined
Predictors
Genome
Gene
Prediction
Evaluation
Experiments
Experiment
Human

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Proteins without 3D structure : Definition, detection and beyond. / Orosz, F.; Ovádi, J.

In: Bioinformatics, Vol. 27, No. 11, btr175, 06.2011, p. 1449-1454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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