Protein synthesis, cellular defence and hprt-mutations induced by low-dose neutron irradiation

Annamaria Dám, Noemi E. Bogdándi, István Polonyi, Márta M. Sárdy, I. Balásházy, József Pálfalvy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The mutagenic potential of low-dose neutrons was studied to demonstrate RAR, and was aimed to recognise the correlation of the effectiveness of antioxidant enzymes and the synthesis of certain proteins. The CHO cells were adapted by priming exposure with neutron doses of 0.5–50 mGy and with dose rates of 1.59–10 mGy min−1. A total of 2–4 Gy of gamma radiation after 1–48 h then challenged the cells. The number of induced hprt-mutants scored was to be reduced by 33–57% when priming was administered, compared to a single dose of challenge, depending on the adapting dose and dose rate. For adaptation, the most appropriate priming dose was 2 mGy and 5 h was the optimal time for its development. Six main, induced proteins were detected (109, 70, 65, 60, 57, 45 kDa). The protein 70 kDa was identified after the priming and challenge dose, but it disappeared after their combination. The capacity of the endogenous antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, SOD) to remove reactive oxygen species had been shown to be enhanced. It could be concluded that low-dose neutrons also induced RAR and the contribution of induced proteins; furthermore, the antioxidant potential would be in part responsible for the RAR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-345
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Congress Series
Volume1236
Issue numberC
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2002

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Neutrons
Mutation
Antioxidants
Proteins
Radiation Dosage
CHO Cells
Gamma Rays
Superoxide Dismutase
Reactive Oxygen Species
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Low-dose neutrons
  • Mutation
  • Proteins
  • Radio-adaptive response
  • Superoxide dismutase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Protein synthesis, cellular defence and hprt-mutations induced by low-dose neutron irradiation. / Dám, Annamaria; Bogdándi, Noemi E.; Polonyi, István; Sárdy, Márta M.; Balásházy, I.; Pálfalvy, József.

In: International Congress Series, Vol. 1236, No. C, 01.07.2002, p. 341-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dám, Annamaria ; Bogdándi, Noemi E. ; Polonyi, István ; Sárdy, Márta M. ; Balásházy, I. ; Pálfalvy, József. / Protein synthesis, cellular defence and hprt-mutations induced by low-dose neutron irradiation. In: International Congress Series. 2002 ; Vol. 1236, No. C. pp. 341-345.
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