Protein O-mannosylation is crucial for cell wall integrity, septation and viability in fission yeast

Tobias Willer, Martin Brandl, M. Sipiczki, Sabine Strahl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) initiate the assembly of O-mannosyl glycans, which are of fundamental importance in eukaryotes. The PMT family, which is classified into PMT1, PMT2 and PMT4 subfamilies, is evolutionarily conserved. Despite the fact that PMTs are crucial for viability of baker's yeast as well as of mouse, recent studies suggested that there are significant differences in the organization and properties of the O-mannosylation machinery between yeasts and mammals. In this study we identified and characterized the PMT family of the archae-ascomycete Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae where the PMT family is highly redundant, in S. pombe only one member of each PMT subfamily is present, namely, oma1+ (protein O-mannosyltransferase), oma2+ and oma4+. They all act as protein O-mannosyltransferases in vivo. oma1+ and oma2 + form heteromeric protein complexes and recognize different protein substrates compared to oma4+, suggesting that similar principles underlie mannosyltransfer reaction in S. pombe and budding yeast. Deletion of oma2+, as well as simultaneous deletion of oma1+ and oma4+ is lethal. Characterization of the viable S. pombe oma1Δ and oma4Δ single mutants showed that a lack of O-mannosylation results in abnormal cell wall and septum formation, thereby severely affecting cell morphology and cell-cell separation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-170
Number of pages15
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

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Schizosaccharomyces
Cell Wall
Cell Survival
Proteins
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Ascomycota
Saccharomycetales
protein O-mannosyltransferase
Cell Separation
Eukaryota
Polysaccharides
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mammals
Yeasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Protein O-mannosylation is crucial for cell wall integrity, septation and viability in fission yeast. / Willer, Tobias; Brandl, Martin; Sipiczki, M.; Strahl, Sabine.

In: Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 57, No. 1, 07.2005, p. 156-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willer, Tobias ; Brandl, Martin ; Sipiczki, M. ; Strahl, Sabine. / Protein O-mannosylation is crucial for cell wall integrity, septation and viability in fission yeast. In: Molecular Microbiology. 2005 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 156-170.
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