Protective effects of L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine on ischaemia-reperfusion-induced inflammatory reactions

Tünde Tőkés, Eszter Tuboly, Gabriella Varga, László Major, M. Ghyczy-, J. Kaszaki, M. Borós

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Choline-containing dietary phospholipids, including phosphatidylcholine (PC), may function as anti-inflammatory substances, but the mechanism remains largely unknown. We investigated the effects of L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), a deacylated PC derivative, in a rodent model of small intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury.

METHODS: Anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, mesenteric IR (45 min mesenteric artery occlusion, followed by 180 min reperfusion), IR with GPC pretreatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to ischaemia) or IR with GPC post-treatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to reperfusion) groups. Macrohaemodynamics and microhaemodynamic parameters were measured; intestinal inflammatory markers (xanthine oxidoreductase activity, superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels) and liver ATP contents were determined.

RESULTS: The IR challenge reduced the intestinal intramural red blood cell velocity, increased the mesenteric vascular resistance, the tissue xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the superoxide production, and the nitrotyrosine levels, and the ATP content of the liver was decreased. Exogenous GPC attenuated the macro- and microcirculatory dysfunction and provided significant protection against the radical production resulting from the IR stress. The GPC pretreatment alleviated the hepatic ATP depletion, the reductions in the mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric artery flow, and similarly to the post-treatments with GPC, also decreased the xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the intestinal superoxide production, the nitrotyrosine level, and normalized the microcirculatory dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the effectiveness of GPC therapies and provide indirect evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of PC could be linked to a reaction involving the polar part of the molecule.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-118
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

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Glycerylphosphorylcholine
Reperfusion
Ischemia
Xanthine Dehydrogenase
Phosphatidylcholines
Superoxides
Adenosine Triphosphate
Liver
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Mesenteric Arteries
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Choline
Reperfusion Injury
Vascular Resistance
Sprague Dawley Rats
Rodentia
Phospholipids
Arterial Pressure
Erythrocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Protective effects of L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine on ischaemia-reperfusion-induced inflammatory reactions. / Tőkés, Tünde; Tuboly, Eszter; Varga, Gabriella; Major, László; Ghyczy-, M.; Kaszaki, J.; Borós, M.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 109-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Tőkés, Tünde

AU - Tuboly, Eszter

AU - Varga, Gabriella

AU - Major, László

AU - Ghyczy-, M.

AU - Kaszaki, J.

AU - Borós, M.

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N2 - PURPOSE: Choline-containing dietary phospholipids, including phosphatidylcholine (PC), may function as anti-inflammatory substances, but the mechanism remains largely unknown. We investigated the effects of L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), a deacylated PC derivative, in a rodent model of small intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury.METHODS: Anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, mesenteric IR (45 min mesenteric artery occlusion, followed by 180 min reperfusion), IR with GPC pretreatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to ischaemia) or IR with GPC post-treatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to reperfusion) groups. Macrohaemodynamics and microhaemodynamic parameters were measured; intestinal inflammatory markers (xanthine oxidoreductase activity, superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels) and liver ATP contents were determined.RESULTS: The IR challenge reduced the intestinal intramural red blood cell velocity, increased the mesenteric vascular resistance, the tissue xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the superoxide production, and the nitrotyrosine levels, and the ATP content of the liver was decreased. Exogenous GPC attenuated the macro- and microcirculatory dysfunction and provided significant protection against the radical production resulting from the IR stress. The GPC pretreatment alleviated the hepatic ATP depletion, the reductions in the mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric artery flow, and similarly to the post-treatments with GPC, also decreased the xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the intestinal superoxide production, the nitrotyrosine level, and normalized the microcirculatory dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the effectiveness of GPC therapies and provide indirect evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of PC could be linked to a reaction involving the polar part of the molecule.

AB - PURPOSE: Choline-containing dietary phospholipids, including phosphatidylcholine (PC), may function as anti-inflammatory substances, but the mechanism remains largely unknown. We investigated the effects of L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine (GPC), a deacylated PC derivative, in a rodent model of small intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury.METHODS: Anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control, mesenteric IR (45 min mesenteric artery occlusion, followed by 180 min reperfusion), IR with GPC pretreatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to ischaemia) or IR with GPC post-treatment (16.56 mg kg⁻¹ GPC i.v., 5 min prior to reperfusion) groups. Macrohaemodynamics and microhaemodynamic parameters were measured; intestinal inflammatory markers (xanthine oxidoreductase activity, superoxide and nitrotyrosine levels) and liver ATP contents were determined.RESULTS: The IR challenge reduced the intestinal intramural red blood cell velocity, increased the mesenteric vascular resistance, the tissue xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the superoxide production, and the nitrotyrosine levels, and the ATP content of the liver was decreased. Exogenous GPC attenuated the macro- and microcirculatory dysfunction and provided significant protection against the radical production resulting from the IR stress. The GPC pretreatment alleviated the hepatic ATP depletion, the reductions in the mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric artery flow, and similarly to the post-treatments with GPC, also decreased the xanthine oxidoreductase activity, the intestinal superoxide production, the nitrotyrosine level, and normalized the microcirculatory dysfunction.CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the effectiveness of GPC therapies and provide indirect evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of PC could be linked to a reaction involving the polar part of the molecule.

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