Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage

Beatrix Farkas, B. Sümegi, Gyorgy Rabloczky, Bela Csete, Balazs Hodosi, Marta Magyarlaki, Sandor Bernath, Peter Literati Nagy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The ultraviolet (UV) components of sunlight are now recognized as major environmental factors deleterious to human health.1-4 Skin cancer is the most common malignancy among Caucasians.2,4-8 The UV light in the solar spectrum is conventionally divided into UVC (200 to 290 nm; this does not reach the Earth), UVB (290 to 320 nm) and UVA, which is subdivided into short-wave UVA II (320 to 340 nm), and long-wave UVA I (340 to 400 nm). The UV rays of sunlight penetrate into the skin as a function of their wavelengths. Radiation of shorter wavelengths (UVB) is mostly absorbed in the epidermis and interacts predominantly with keratinocytes. Radiation of longer wavelengths (UVA, 320 to 400 nm) penetrates deeper, affecting the epidermal and dermal cells. Convolution of the spectra with biological damage action spectra shows that, despite the significantly greater incidence of UVA radiation (95% of the UV reaching the Earth), the predominant acute and chronic damages to the skin are associated with the UVB portion of the solar spectrum (in a ratio of 4:1).9-11 However, the adverse effects of UVA and UVB are usually additive.11,12 Photodamage, specific damage produced in the skin tissue by single or repeated (cumulative) exposure to UV light (290 to 400 nm), is considered to be the initiating step of photocarcinogenesis.13 UV radiation-induced injury to the skin can be subdivided into acute (e.g., sunburn) and chronic (e.g., photoaging, solar keratosis, and skin cancers) photodamage.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPARP as a Therapeutic Target
PublisherCRC Press
Pages257-276
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781420042405
ISBN (Print)0849300738, 9780849300738
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Ultraviolet Rays
Skin
Sunlight
Skin Neoplasms
Radiation
Wavelength
Sunburn
Radio Waves
Keratosis
Earth (planet)
Radiation Injuries
Keratinocytes
Epidermis
Convolution
Ultraviolet radiation
Tissue
Incidence
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Farkas, B., Sümegi, B., Rabloczky, G., Csete, B., Hodosi, B., Magyarlaki, M., ... Nagy, P. L. (2002). Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage. In PARP as a Therapeutic Target (pp. 257-276). CRC Press.

Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage. / Farkas, Beatrix; Sümegi, B.; Rabloczky, Gyorgy; Csete, Bela; Hodosi, Balazs; Magyarlaki, Marta; Bernath, Sandor; Nagy, Peter Literati.

PARP as a Therapeutic Target. CRC Press, 2002. p. 257-276.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Farkas, B, Sümegi, B, Rabloczky, G, Csete, B, Hodosi, B, Magyarlaki, M, Bernath, S & Nagy, PL 2002, Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage. in PARP as a Therapeutic Target. CRC Press, pp. 257-276.
Farkas B, Sümegi B, Rabloczky G, Csete B, Hodosi B, Magyarlaki M et al. Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage. In PARP as a Therapeutic Target. CRC Press. 2002. p. 257-276
Farkas, Beatrix ; Sümegi, B. ; Rabloczky, Gyorgy ; Csete, Bela ; Hodosi, Balazs ; Magyarlaki, Marta ; Bernath, Sandor ; Nagy, Peter Literati. / Protecting effect of PARP inhibition on ultraviolet light-induced skin damage. PARP as a Therapeutic Target. CRC Press, 2002. pp. 257-276
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