Production of microemulsion by membrane emulsification: Comparison of empty ceramic tube membrane and membrane equipped with static turbulence promoters

K. Albert, A. Koris, I. Gáspár, G. Rácz, Gy Vatai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Membrane emulsification (ME) is a relatively new technique for the highly controlled production of particulates, which helps to obtain a narrower distribution compared to other emulsification techniques such as homogenizers or ultrasound. Benefits of membrane emulsification for food applications include the low shear properties and the uniform size distribution. In this process, the dispersed phase (oil) is pressed through the pores of a microporous membrane directly into the continuous phase (water) flowing tangentially to the membrane surface. The purpose of the emulsification experimentations was to find and model operating conditions of the operation. In laboratory experiments from conventional, commercial grade sunflower oil (dispersed phase) and from distilled water (solid phase), emulsions were prepared. The ceramic tube membrane with nominal pore size of 1.4 μm was used in the experiments (ZrO2). In order to increase the shear-stress near the membrane wall (influence the characteristics of the flow regime of the continuous phase), a kind of self-fabricated helical-shaped-ribbon reducer was installed inside the tube membrane.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalActa Alimentaria
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Membrane emulsification
  • Modelling
  • Oil-in-water emulsion
  • Static turbulence promoter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

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