Production of ibuprofen in crystalline and amorphous forms by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD)

Tamás Gera, T. Smausz, Judit Kopniczky, G. Galbács, Rita Ambrus, P. Szabó-Révész, B. Hopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied the applicability of Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) as a particle engineering method in the field of drug preformulation. Improving the dissolution and thereby the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble compounds is still a challenging task in pharmaceutical formulation. It was shown earlier that particle size reduction or the development of stable amorphous forms may both facilitate drug absorption. Using ibuprofen as a model drug, we studied the ablated particles obtained by pulsed-laser-beam irradiation of ibuprofen tablets. Nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses (KrF excimer laser, λ = 248 nm, FWHM = 18 ns; 600 fs) were applied at various ambient pressures (10−4 mbar to 1 bar). The ablated particles were deposited for further analysis by FTIR, Raman Spectroscopy, XRPD, DSC and SEM. We found that all deposits prepared in vacuum by ns-pulses were chemically identical with ibuprofen, but their morphology varied depending on the applied pressure. At higher pressures (10 mbar to 10−1 mbar) the deposits exhibited similar crystalline morphology as the initial ibuprofen, while at lower pressures (10−2 mbar to 10−3 mbar), the deposits were rather amorphous. Using fs-pulses, molecular decomposition occurred at all background pressures. We have established that PLD with ns-pulses is a promising technique in the field of drug preformulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-367
Number of pages9
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume493
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Ibuprofen
Pulsed laser deposition
pulsed laser deposition
drugs
Crystalline materials
deposits
pulses
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Deposits
bioavailability
tablets
excimer lasers
Excimer lasers
pulsed lasers
dissolving
Full width at half maximum
Ultrashort pulses
Pulsed lasers
low pressure
Raman spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Amorphization
  • Drug preformulation
  • Femtosecond laser
  • Ibuprofen
  • Nanosecond laser
  • Pulsed Laser Deposition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Production of ibuprofen in crystalline and amorphous forms by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). / Gera, Tamás; Smausz, T.; Kopniczky, Judit; Galbács, G.; Ambrus, Rita; Szabó-Révész, P.; Hopp, B.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 493, 01.11.2019, p. 359-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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