Primary cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme with an unusually long survival. Case report

K. Hegedus, P. Molnár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Light microscopic and electron microscopic findings of a primary cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GM) are presented. An infiltrating tumor of the vermis and the right cerebellar hemisphere had been partially removed from a 30-year-old woman. Postoperative irradiation to the posterior fossa enabled her to work for the next 5 1/2 years. At readmission, progressive pontocerebellar signs were observed. In spite of repeated irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy, she died after 1 month. Autopsy revealed extensive tumorous infiltration of the right cerebellar hemisphere, pons, and medulla. Both the biopsy and autopsy specimens showed typical features of GM. Tumorous propagation resulted in extreme enlargement of the right inferior olive. Electron microscopic analysis disclosed characteristic bundles of glial filaments, cytoplasmic inclusions lying within nuclear folds, and intracytoplasmic granules of uncertain nature. The possible cause of the long survival is discussed and a comparison is made with previously reported cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-592
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume58
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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Glioblastoma
Autopsy
Electrons
Survival
Pons
Inclusion Bodies
Neuroglia
Biopsy
Light
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Cerebellar Vermis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Primary cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme with an unusually long survival. Case report. / Hegedus, K.; Molnár, P.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 58, No. 4, 1983, p. 589-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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