Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary

Imre Rurik, L. Kalabay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Background. There are many differences between the two genders, biological, sociological and also in their ageing process. Family physicians can observe their patients, should screen them for most important chronic diseases and, most importantly treat them. Primary care is the best field for long-term (sometimes life-long) follow up of patients. Aims. To observe the nutritional habits of elderly women and compare to those of men. Methods. Two-hundred and sixty six people (109 men and 157 women, age>60 years) were consecutively selected among primary care patients in Budapest, Hungary. They were asked to fill in a questionnaire on their life style and eating habits including a food frequency questionnaire that contained 41 items of typical meals and beverages. Data on self-recorded body weight in each life decade were also questioned. Medical check-up, registration of anthropological parameters, and laboratory tests were also performed. Fifty-three people were involved in a 3-day dietary recall. Results. The meal frequency was increased during aging in both genders. Lunch was preferred by 79% of women and 26% of men as a principal meal, respectively. Alcoholic beverages were consumed less frequently by women (2% had a drink more than once a week, compared to 26% of men). The fluid intake of women was low in general- They reported only 1 liter/day. Milk, diary products, fresh fruit, bread, biscuits, chocolate, coffee and vitamin supplements were consumed more frequently by women. The daily energy intake was 8.78 MJ by women and 9.75 MJ by men. Fat was present in 39% of all energy intake, higher than recommended. Over the decades of life body weight gain was higher in women than in men (mean: 13.6 kg ± SD, and male mean: 12 ± SD kg, p<0.01). Women were influenced by the price of purchased food more than men. Conclusion. High energy intake during decades leads to overweight in both genders (BMI >27kg/m2). Compared to men, women's the eating habits and food choice are closer to healthy. Suggestion: Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate gender-related differences of nutrition in the elderly in order to establish public health suggestions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWomen and Aging
Subtitle of host publicationNew Research
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages515-528
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781617280238
ISBN (Print)9781604565751
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Hungary
Weight Gain
Habits
Primary Health Care
Meals
Feeding Behavior
Energy Intake
Body Weight
Food
Alcoholic Beverages
Lunch
Anthropology
Bread
Coffee
Beverages
Family Physicians
Vitamins
Life Style
Fruit
Milk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Rurik, I., & Kalabay, L. (2009). Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary. In Women and Aging: New Research (pp. 515-528). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary. / Rurik, Imre; Kalabay, L.

Women and Aging: New Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009. p. 515-528.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rurik, I & Kalabay, L 2009, Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary. in Women and Aging: New Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 515-528.
Rurik I, Kalabay L. Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary. In Women and Aging: New Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2009. p. 515-528
Rurik, Imre ; Kalabay, L. / Primary care evaluation on nutritional habit and weight gain of elderly women in Hungary. Women and Aging: New Research. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009. pp. 515-528
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abstract = "Background. There are many differences between the two genders, biological, sociological and also in their ageing process. Family physicians can observe their patients, should screen them for most important chronic diseases and, most importantly treat them. Primary care is the best field for long-term (sometimes life-long) follow up of patients. Aims. To observe the nutritional habits of elderly women and compare to those of men. Methods. Two-hundred and sixty six people (109 men and 157 women, age>60 years) were consecutively selected among primary care patients in Budapest, Hungary. They were asked to fill in a questionnaire on their life style and eating habits including a food frequency questionnaire that contained 41 items of typical meals and beverages. Data on self-recorded body weight in each life decade were also questioned. Medical check-up, registration of anthropological parameters, and laboratory tests were also performed. Fifty-three people were involved in a 3-day dietary recall. Results. The meal frequency was increased during aging in both genders. Lunch was preferred by 79{\%} of women and 26{\%} of men as a principal meal, respectively. Alcoholic beverages were consumed less frequently by women (2{\%} had a drink more than once a week, compared to 26{\%} of men). The fluid intake of women was low in general- They reported only 1 liter/day. Milk, diary products, fresh fruit, bread, biscuits, chocolate, coffee and vitamin supplements were consumed more frequently by women. The daily energy intake was 8.78 MJ by women and 9.75 MJ by men. Fat was present in 39{\%} of all energy intake, higher than recommended. Over the decades of life body weight gain was higher in women than in men (mean: 13.6 kg ± SD, and male mean: 12 ± SD kg, p<0.01). Women were influenced by the price of purchased food more than men. Conclusion. High energy intake during decades leads to overweight in both genders (BMI >27kg/m2). Compared to men, women's the eating habits and food choice are closer to healthy. Suggestion: Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate gender-related differences of nutrition in the elderly in order to establish public health suggestions.",
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