Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella infantis isolates originating from different points of the broiler chicken-human food chain in Hungary

N. Nógrády, G. Kardos, A. Bistyák, I. Turcsányi, J. Mészáros, Zs Galántai, Á Juhász, P. Samu, J. É Kaszanyitzky, J. Pászti, I. Kiss

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Abstract

During the 10-month study period Salmonella contamination of broiler houses and the flocks reared in three farms (A, B and C), the slaughter houses where the flocks were slaughtered, as well as the carcass and retail raw meat products originating from them was investigated. In the broiler farm A five consecutive flocks, in the B and C farms one flock was sampled. Environmental samples were taken prior to the introductions. Environmental, drinking water, feed and faecal samples were collected regularly using standard methods. Before and during processing of the flocks, environmental and carcass samples were taken at the abattoirs. Salmonella contamination of the carcass, retail meat, as well as stool samples of farm and abattoir workers and from human illnesses registered in the same period and region were also examined. Isolation, sero-, phage- and antibiotic resistance typing, class 1 integron and plasmid profiling of the strains were performed; their genetic relationship was assessed by PFGE. Although the broiler house and the faecal samples of the 5 flocks of the farm A were negative for Salmonella, S. infantis was isolated from 20-100% of the abattoir carcass samples. The retail raw meat samples were 0-100% S. infantis positive. The environmental samples of farm B were Salmonella negative, but the examined flock was contaminated: S. infantis was identified from 43% of the faecal samples. This serotype was identified in 100% of the carcass and retail raw meat samples. From environmental samples taken before the arrival of the 1-day-old chicks in the broiler house C, S. infantis was cultured. S. infantis prevalence in the faecal samples was 35% and all the carcass and retail raw meat samples were S. infantis contaminated. Altogether 164 S. infantis strains were isolated out of which 145 were further characterized. The vast majority (142/145) of the strains belonged to phage types 217 and 213. All but one were characterized by the nalidixic acid-streptomycin-sulphonamide-tetracycline resistances, had an 885 bp class 1 integron and a large plasmid of > 168 kb in size. The strains showed ≥ 88.7% genetic similarity. The results obtained shows that the same multi-drug resistant S. infantis clone was spread from the examined broiler farms contaminating the slaughter and the retail meat and appeared in the human illnesses of the examined region that was earlier detected as the dominant clone characteristic of the broiler and human population of the whole country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-167
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume127
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 30 2008

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Salmonella Infantis
human food chain
Food Chain
Hungary
Salmonella
Chickens
Abattoirs
Meat
broiler chickens
Integrons
flocks
raw meat
farms
sampling
Bacteriophages
slaughterhouses
Plasmids
Clone Cells
Tetracycline Resistance
Nalidixic Acid

Keywords

  • Broiler flocks
  • Chicken carcass
  • Chicken faeces
  • PFGE
  • Retail raw meat
  • Salmonella infantis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella infantis isolates originating from different points of the broiler chicken-human food chain in Hungary. / Nógrády, N.; Kardos, G.; Bistyák, A.; Turcsányi, I.; Mészáros, J.; Galántai, Zs; Juhász, Á; Samu, P.; Kaszanyitzky, J. É; Pászti, J.; Kiss, I.

In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, Vol. 127, No. 1-2, 30.09.2008, p. 162-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nógrády, N. ; Kardos, G. ; Bistyák, A. ; Turcsányi, I. ; Mészáros, J. ; Galántai, Zs ; Juhász, Á ; Samu, P. ; Kaszanyitzky, J. É ; Pászti, J. ; Kiss, I. / Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella infantis isolates originating from different points of the broiler chicken-human food chain in Hungary. In: International Journal of Food Microbiology. 2008 ; Vol. 127, No. 1-2. pp. 162-167.
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