Prestroke alcohol consumption and smoking are not associated with stroke severity, disability at discharge, and case fatality

Klára Fekete, Szabolcs Szatmári, Ildikó Szocs, Csilla Szekeres, József Szász, László Mihálka, Volodymyr Smolanka, László Kardos, L. Csiba, D. Bereczki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are known risk factors for stroke, but their influence on stroke severity and outcome may also be important. We tested if alcohol consumption and smoking relate to initial stroke severity, disability at discharge from hospital, and outcome at 30 days and at 1 year in 1049 patients of the Mures-Uzhgorod-Debrecen database. Methods Initial stroke severity was scored by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Case fatality and the modified outcome scale of the First International Stroke Trial were used to assess outcome. We used multiple regression analysis. Results Before their stroke, 24.5% were smokers and 24.7% admitted regular alcohol consumption. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption status was associated with initial stroke severity. Case fatalities at discharge, at 30 days, and at 1 year were 12.2%, 16.9%, and 28.3%, respectively. Initial stroke severity, hemorrhagic subtype, and age in men over 60 years were strong predictors of outcome. We did not find significant difference among alcohol consumers and nonconsumers in 30-day and in 1-year case fatality in all stroke patients and in ischemic stroke patients. In hemorrhagic stroke, there was a nonsignificant tendency for higher case fatality among alcohol consumers (39.5% versus 26.4%, P >.2, at 30 days and 48.8% versus 35.8%, P >.2, at 1 year). Smoking did not influence significantly the outcome at 30 days and at 1 year. Conclusion Despite being risk factors, prestroke smoking and alcohol consumption do not have a significant influence on stroke severity and on short- and long-term outcome.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Stroke
Alcohols
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Regression Analysis
Databases

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • outcome
  • severity
  • smoking
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Prestroke alcohol consumption and smoking are not associated with stroke severity, disability at discharge, and case fatality. / Fekete, Klára; Szatmári, Szabolcs; Szocs, Ildikó; Szekeres, Csilla; Szász, József; Mihálka, László; Smolanka, Volodymyr; Kardos, László; Csiba, L.; Bereczki, D.

In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fekete, Klára ; Szatmári, Szabolcs ; Szocs, Ildikó ; Szekeres, Csilla ; Szász, József ; Mihálka, László ; Smolanka, Volodymyr ; Kardos, László ; Csiba, L. ; Bereczki, D. / Prestroke alcohol consumption and smoking are not associated with stroke severity, disability at discharge, and case fatality. In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background Heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are known risk factors for stroke, but their influence on stroke severity and outcome may also be important. We tested if alcohol consumption and smoking relate to initial stroke severity, disability at discharge from hospital, and outcome at 30 days and at 1 year in 1049 patients of the Mures-Uzhgorod-Debrecen database. Methods Initial stroke severity was scored by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Case fatality and the modified outcome scale of the First International Stroke Trial were used to assess outcome. We used multiple regression analysis. Results Before their stroke, 24.5{\%} were smokers and 24.7{\%} admitted regular alcohol consumption. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption status was associated with initial stroke severity. Case fatalities at discharge, at 30 days, and at 1 year were 12.2{\%}, 16.9{\%}, and 28.3{\%}, respectively. Initial stroke severity, hemorrhagic subtype, and age in men over 60 years were strong predictors of outcome. We did not find significant difference among alcohol consumers and nonconsumers in 30-day and in 1-year case fatality in all stroke patients and in ischemic stroke patients. In hemorrhagic stroke, there was a nonsignificant tendency for higher case fatality among alcohol consumers (39.5{\%} versus 26.4{\%}, P >.2, at 30 days and 48.8{\%} versus 35.8{\%}, P >.2, at 1 year). Smoking did not influence significantly the outcome at 30 days and at 1 year. Conclusion Despite being risk factors, prestroke smoking and alcohol consumption do not have a significant influence on stroke severity and on short- and long-term outcome.",
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T1 - Prestroke alcohol consumption and smoking are not associated with stroke severity, disability at discharge, and case fatality

AU - Fekete, Klára

AU - Szatmári, Szabolcs

AU - Szocs, Ildikó

AU - Szekeres, Csilla

AU - Szász, József

AU - Mihálka, László

AU - Smolanka, Volodymyr

AU - Kardos, László

AU - Csiba, L.

AU - Bereczki, D.

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Background Heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are known risk factors for stroke, but their influence on stroke severity and outcome may also be important. We tested if alcohol consumption and smoking relate to initial stroke severity, disability at discharge from hospital, and outcome at 30 days and at 1 year in 1049 patients of the Mures-Uzhgorod-Debrecen database. Methods Initial stroke severity was scored by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Case fatality and the modified outcome scale of the First International Stroke Trial were used to assess outcome. We used multiple regression analysis. Results Before their stroke, 24.5% were smokers and 24.7% admitted regular alcohol consumption. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption status was associated with initial stroke severity. Case fatalities at discharge, at 30 days, and at 1 year were 12.2%, 16.9%, and 28.3%, respectively. Initial stroke severity, hemorrhagic subtype, and age in men over 60 years were strong predictors of outcome. We did not find significant difference among alcohol consumers and nonconsumers in 30-day and in 1-year case fatality in all stroke patients and in ischemic stroke patients. In hemorrhagic stroke, there was a nonsignificant tendency for higher case fatality among alcohol consumers (39.5% versus 26.4%, P >.2, at 30 days and 48.8% versus 35.8%, P >.2, at 1 year). Smoking did not influence significantly the outcome at 30 days and at 1 year. Conclusion Despite being risk factors, prestroke smoking and alcohol consumption do not have a significant influence on stroke severity and on short- and long-term outcome.

AB - Background Heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are known risk factors for stroke, but their influence on stroke severity and outcome may also be important. We tested if alcohol consumption and smoking relate to initial stroke severity, disability at discharge from hospital, and outcome at 30 days and at 1 year in 1049 patients of the Mures-Uzhgorod-Debrecen database. Methods Initial stroke severity was scored by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Case fatality and the modified outcome scale of the First International Stroke Trial were used to assess outcome. We used multiple regression analysis. Results Before their stroke, 24.5% were smokers and 24.7% admitted regular alcohol consumption. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption status was associated with initial stroke severity. Case fatalities at discharge, at 30 days, and at 1 year were 12.2%, 16.9%, and 28.3%, respectively. Initial stroke severity, hemorrhagic subtype, and age in men over 60 years were strong predictors of outcome. We did not find significant difference among alcohol consumers and nonconsumers in 30-day and in 1-year case fatality in all stroke patients and in ischemic stroke patients. In hemorrhagic stroke, there was a nonsignificant tendency for higher case fatality among alcohol consumers (39.5% versus 26.4%, P >.2, at 30 days and 48.8% versus 35.8%, P >.2, at 1 year). Smoking did not influence significantly the outcome at 30 days and at 1 year. Conclusion Despite being risk factors, prestroke smoking and alcohol consumption do not have a significant influence on stroke severity and on short- and long-term outcome.

KW - alcohol

KW - outcome

KW - severity

KW - smoking

KW - Stroke

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DO - 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2013.08.006

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JO - Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases

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SN - 1052-3057

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