Prediction Beyond the Borders

ERP Indices of Boundary Extension-Related Error

I. Czigler, Helene Intraub, Gábor Stefanics

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Boundary extension (BE) is a rapidly occurring memory error in which participants incorrectly remember having seen beyond the boundaries of a view. However, behavioral data has provided no insight into how quickly after the onset of a test picture the effect is detected. To determine the time course of BE from neural responses we conducted a BE experiment while recording EEG. We exploited a diagnostic response asymmetry to mismatched views (a closer and wider view of the same scene) in which the same pair of views is rated as more similar when the closer item is shown first than vice versa. On each trial, a closer or wider view was presented for 250 ms followed by a 250-ms mask and either the identical view or a mismatched view. Boundary ratings replicated the typical asymmetry. We found a similar asymmetry in ERP responses in the 265-285 ms interval where the second member of the close-then-wide pairs evoked less negative responses at left parieto-temporal sites compared to the wide-then-close condition. We also found diagnostic ERP effects in the 500-560 ms range, where ERPs to wide-then-close pairs were more positive at centro-parietal sites than in the other three conditions, which is thought to be related to participants' confidence in their perceptual decision. The ERP effect in the 265-285 ms range suggests the falsely remembered region beyond the view-boundaries of S1 is rapidly available and impacts assessment of the test picture within the first 265 ms of viewing, suggesting that extrapolated scene structure may be computed rapidly enough to play a role in the integration of successive views during visual scanning.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere74245
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 12 2013

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Enterprise resource planning
prediction
Masks
Electroencephalography
testing
Scanning
Data storage equipment
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prediction Beyond the Borders : ERP Indices of Boundary Extension-Related Error. / Czigler, I.; Intraub, Helene; Stefanics, Gábor.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 9, e74245, 12.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Czigler, I. ; Intraub, Helene ; Stefanics, Gábor. / Prediction Beyond the Borders : ERP Indices of Boundary Extension-Related Error. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.
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