Predictability of an atmospheric blocking event that occurred on 15 December 2005

Mio Matsueda, Masayuki Kyouda, Z. Tóth, H. L. Tanaka, Tadashi Tsuyuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Atmospheric blocking occurred over the Rocky Mountains at 1200 UTC 15 December 2005. The operational medium-range ensemble forecasts of the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC), the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), as initialized at 1200UTC10 December 2005, showed remarkable differences regarding this event. All of the NCEP members failed to predict the correct location of the blocking, whereas almost all of the JMA members and most of the CMC members were successful in predicting the correct location. The present study investigated the factors that caused NCEP to incorrectly predict the blocking location, based on an ensemble-based sensitivity analysis and the JMA global spectral model (GSM) multianalysis ensemble forecasts with NCEP, regionally amplified NCEP, and globally amplified NCEP analyses. A sensitive area for the blocking formation was detected over the central North Pacific. In this area, the NCEP control analysis experienced problems in the handling of a cutoff cyclone, and the NCEP initial perturbations were ineffective in reducing uncertainties in the NCEP control analysis. The JMA GSM multianalysis ensemble forecasts revealed that regional amplification of initial perturbations over the sensitive area could lead to further improvements in forecasts over the blocking region without degradation of forecasts over the Northern Hemisphere (NH), whereas the global amplification of initial perturbations could lead to improved forecasts over the blocking region and degraded forecasts over the NH. This finding may suggest that excessive amplification of initial perturbations over nonsensitive areas is undesirable, and that case-dependent rescaling of initial perturbations may be of value compared with climatology-based rescaling, which is widely used in current operational ensemble prediction systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2455-2470
Number of pages16
JournalMonthly Weather Review
Volume139
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

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atmospheric blocking
prediction
perturbation
amplification
Northern Hemisphere
forecast
cyclone
climatology
sensitivity analysis

Keywords

  • Blocking
  • Ensembles
  • Model comparison
  • Numerical weather prediction/forecasting
  • Sensitivity studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Predictability of an atmospheric blocking event that occurred on 15 December 2005. / Matsueda, Mio; Kyouda, Masayuki; Tóth, Z.; Tanaka, H. L.; Tsuyuki, Tadashi.

In: Monthly Weather Review, Vol. 139, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 2455-2470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matsueda, Mio ; Kyouda, Masayuki ; Tóth, Z. ; Tanaka, H. L. ; Tsuyuki, Tadashi. / Predictability of an atmospheric blocking event that occurred on 15 December 2005. In: Monthly Weather Review. 2011 ; Vol. 139, No. 8. pp. 2455-2470.
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