Predatory effect of Copepods on the larvae of some freshwater fish

Ottó Boltizár, Tamás Müller, B. Urbányi, Zsolt Csenki, Katalin Bakos, Ádam Staszny, Árpád Hegyi, Balázs Kucska, Dariusz Kucharczyk, László Horváth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The survival rates of fish larvae in lentic waters are highly dependent on the presence or absence of predatory copepods. The predatory impact of this planktonic group was tested in the laboratory. Early larval stages of 11 different common freshwater fish larvae together with Copepods were investigated in test conditions determining the Copepod-fish larvae interaction. The tested fish species were: Zebra fish (Danio rerio), Tench (Tinca tinca), Crucian carp (Carassius carassius), Pike-perch (Sander lucioperca), Rudd (Scardinius erythrophthalmus), Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio), Bream (Abramis brama), Common carp (Cyprinus carpio), Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), Silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), and Wels catfish (Silurus glanis). In these tests the most vulnerable fish larvae was the Zebra fish (losses 97 %) followed by Tench (87 %) and then small sized Crucian carp (75 %). These three species have a phytophilic larval strategy hanging on different water plants or substrates after hatching. In contrast the Pikeperch, which is also small, has another (pelagophilic) strategy, swimming actively in the open water column (losses only 18 %). The phytophilic cyprinids Rudd and Prussian carp suffered losses of 64 % and 45 %, respectively. Two pelagophilic carp with similar body size (Silver carp and Grass carp) experienced 40 - 50 % losses. The phytophilic Common carp and Bream with larger body size had lower losses (6 % and 11 %) with a remarkable resistance against Copepoda predation. The photophobic Wels catfish with larger body size, benthic habit and ambushing behaviour (3.5 %) avoided Copepod attack almost entirely (3.5 % losses). Thus the differing sensitivity of the investigated fish species to Copepod predation mainly depended on the body size and behavioural strategies of their early larval stages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalFundamental and Applied Limnology
Volume190
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

freshwater fish
Copepoda
fish larvae
Carassius gibelio
Silurus glanis
larva
Tinca tinca
Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Sander lucioperca
Ctenopharyngodon idella
larvae
fish
body size
Carassius
Cyprinus carpio
zebras
bream
predation
Abramis brama
Carassius carassius

Keywords

  • Copepods
  • Fish larvae
  • Lithophil
  • Phytophil
  • Predation
  • Spawning grounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

Cite this

Boltizár, O., Müller, T., Urbányi, B., Csenki, Z., Bakos, K., Staszny, Á., ... Horváth, L. (2017). Predatory effect of Copepods on the larvae of some freshwater fish. Fundamental and Applied Limnology, 190(4), 349-356. https://doi.org/10.1127/fal/2017/0682

Predatory effect of Copepods on the larvae of some freshwater fish. / Boltizár, Ottó; Müller, Tamás; Urbányi, B.; Csenki, Zsolt; Bakos, Katalin; Staszny, Ádam; Hegyi, Árpád; Kucska, Balázs; Kucharczyk, Dariusz; Horváth, László.

In: Fundamental and Applied Limnology, Vol. 190, No. 4, 01.01.2017, p. 349-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boltizár, O, Müller, T, Urbányi, B, Csenki, Z, Bakos, K, Staszny, Á, Hegyi, Á, Kucska, B, Kucharczyk, D & Horváth, L 2017, 'Predatory effect of Copepods on the larvae of some freshwater fish', Fundamental and Applied Limnology, vol. 190, no. 4, pp. 349-356. https://doi.org/10.1127/fal/2017/0682
Boltizár, Ottó ; Müller, Tamás ; Urbányi, B. ; Csenki, Zsolt ; Bakos, Katalin ; Staszny, Ádam ; Hegyi, Árpád ; Kucska, Balázs ; Kucharczyk, Dariusz ; Horváth, László. / Predatory effect of Copepods on the larvae of some freshwater fish. In: Fundamental and Applied Limnology. 2017 ; Vol. 190, No. 4. pp. 349-356.
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