Predation on rose galls: Parasitoids and predators determine gall size through directional selection

Zoltán László, Katalin Sólyom, Hunor Prázsmári, Z. Barta, B. Tóthmérész

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both predators and parasitoids can have significant effects on species' life history traits, such as longevity or clutch size. In the case of gall inducers, sporadically there is evidence to suggest that both vertebrate predation and insect parasitoid attack may shape the optimal gall size. While the effects of parasitoids have been studied in detail, the influence of vertebrate predation is less well-investigated. To better understand this aspect of gall size evolution, we studied vertebrate predation on galls of Diplolepis rosae on rose (Rosa canina) shrubs. We measured predation frequency, predation incidence, and predation rate in a large-scale observational field study, as well as an experimental field study. Our combined results suggest that, similarly to parasitoids, vertebrate predation makes a considerable contribution to mortality of gall inducer larvae. On the other hand, its influence on gall size is in direct contrast to the effect of parasitoids, as frequency of vertebrate predation increases with gall size. This suggests that the balance between predation and parasitoid attack shapes the optimal size of D. rosae galls.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere99806
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 11 2014

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Clutches
galls
parasitoids
Vertebrates
Rosa
predation
predators
vertebrates
Diplolepis rosae
Clutch Size
Observational Studies
Larva
Insects
Rosa canina
Mortality
Incidence
clutch size
shrubs
life history
incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Predation on rose galls : Parasitoids and predators determine gall size through directional selection. / László, Zoltán; Sólyom, Katalin; Prázsmári, Hunor; Barta, Z.; Tóthmérész, B.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 6, e99806, 11.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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