Predation mediated population divergence in complex behaviour of nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius)

G. Herczeg, A. Gonda, J. MerilÄ

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The proximate and ultimate explanations for behavioural syndromes (correlated behaviours - a population trait) are poorly understood, and the evolution of behavioural types (configuration of behaviours - an individual trait) has been rarely studied. We investigated population divergence in behavioural syndromes and types using individually reared, completely predator- or conspecific-naïve adult nine-spined sticklebacks (Pungitius pungitius) from two marine and two predatory fish free, isolated pond populations. We found little evidence for the existence of behavioural syndromes, but population divergence in behavioural types was profound: individuals from ponds were quicker in feeding, bolder and more aggressive than individuals from marine environments. Our data reject the hypothesis that behavioural syndromes exist as a result of genetic correlations between behavioural traits, and support the contention that different behavioural types can be predominant in populations differing in predation pressure, most probably as a result of repeated independent evolution of separate behavioural traits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)544-552
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

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Pungitius pungitius
Gasterosteidae
pond
predation
divergence
marine environment
predator
fish
genetic correlation
predators

Keywords

  • Animal personality
  • Behavioural syndrome
  • Behavioural type
  • Common garden
  • Geographic variation
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Predation mediated population divergence in complex behaviour of nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius). / Herczeg, G.; Gonda, A.; MerilÄ, J.

In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 22, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 544-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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