A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon

Translated title of the contribution: Practice of treatment restriction in Hungarian intensive care units

Zubek László, Szabó Léna, J. Gál, Öllos Ádám, Élo Gábor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

End of life decisions affect most of patients in intensive care units, thus, it is important to know both local and international practice in accordance with law and ethical principles for intensive care physicians. Aim: To search for local customs of end of life decisions (withholding or withdrawing the therapy, shortening of the dying process), and to compare the data with the international literature. Methods: In 2007-2008 the fi rst Hungarian survey was performed with the purpose to learn more about local practice of end of life decisions. Questionnaires were sent out electronically to 743 registered members of Hungarian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. Respecting anonymity, 103 replies were statistically evaluated (response rate was 13.8%) and compared with data from other European countries. Results: As expected, it turned out from replies that the practice of domestic intensive care physicians is very paternal and this is promoted by legal regulations that share a similar character. Intensive care physicians generally make their decisions alone (3.75/5 point) without respecting the opinion of the patient (2.57/5 point) the relatives (2.14/5 point) or other medical personnel (2.37/5 point). Furthermore, they prefer not to start a therapy rather than withdraw an ongoing treatment. Nevertheless, the frequency of end of life decisions (3-9% of ICU patients) is smaller than other European countries. Conclusions: There is a need for the expansion of patients' right in our country. For end of life decisions, self determinations must be supported and a dialogue must be established between lawmakers and physicians, in order to improve the legal support of this medical practice.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1530-1536
Number of pages7
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume151
Issue number38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

Intensive Care Units
Critical Care
Physicians
Therapeutics
Personal Autonomy
Anesthesiology
Patient Rights
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

László, Z., Léna, S., Gál, J., Ádám, Ö., & Gábor, É. (2010). A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon. Orvosi Hetilap, 151(38), 1530-1536. https://doi.org/10.1556/OH.2010.28950

A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon. / László, Zubek; Léna, Szabó; Gál, J.; Ádám, Öllos; Gábor, Élo.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 151, No. 38, 01.09.2010, p. 1530-1536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

László, Z, Léna, S, Gál, J, Ádám, Ö & Gábor, É 2010, 'A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon', Orvosi Hetilap, vol. 151, no. 38, pp. 1530-1536. https://doi.org/10.1556/OH.2010.28950
László, Zubek ; Léna, Szabó ; Gál, J. ; Ádám, Öllos ; Gábor, Élo. / A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2010 ; Vol. 151, No. 38. pp. 1530-1536.
@article{c576abbddf2f4763a8b9c3c9e2f3402e,
title = "A kezel{\'e}skorl{\'a}toz{\'a}s gyakorlata a hazai intenz{\'i}v oszt{\'a}lyokon",
abstract = "End of life decisions affect most of patients in intensive care units, thus, it is important to know both local and international practice in accordance with law and ethical principles for intensive care physicians. Aim: To search for local customs of end of life decisions (withholding or withdrawing the therapy, shortening of the dying process), and to compare the data with the international literature. Methods: In 2007-2008 the fi rst Hungarian survey was performed with the purpose to learn more about local practice of end of life decisions. Questionnaires were sent out electronically to 743 registered members of Hungarian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. Respecting anonymity, 103 replies were statistically evaluated (response rate was 13.8{\%}) and compared with data from other European countries. Results: As expected, it turned out from replies that the practice of domestic intensive care physicians is very paternal and this is promoted by legal regulations that share a similar character. Intensive care physicians generally make their decisions alone (3.75/5 point) without respecting the opinion of the patient (2.57/5 point) the relatives (2.14/5 point) or other medical personnel (2.37/5 point). Furthermore, they prefer not to start a therapy rather than withdraw an ongoing treatment. Nevertheless, the frequency of end of life decisions (3-9{\%} of ICU patients) is smaller than other European countries. Conclusions: There is a need for the expansion of patients' right in our country. For end of life decisions, self determinations must be supported and a dialogue must be established between lawmakers and physicians, in order to improve the legal support of this medical practice.",
keywords = "bioethics, end of life decisions, euthanasia, intensive therapy, legal situation, non competent patient, physician assisted suicide, treatment withdrawal, treatment withholding",
author = "Zubek L{\'a}szl{\'o} and Szab{\'o} L{\'e}na and J. G{\'a}l and {\"O}llos {\'A}d{\'a}m and {\'E}lo G{\'a}bor",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1556/OH.2010.28950",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "151",
pages = "1530--1536",
journal = "Orvosi Hetilap",
issn = "0030-6002",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "38",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A kezeléskorlátozás gyakorlata a hazai intenzív osztályokon

AU - László, Zubek

AU - Léna, Szabó

AU - Gál, J.

AU - Ádám, Öllos

AU - Gábor, Élo

PY - 2010/9/1

Y1 - 2010/9/1

N2 - End of life decisions affect most of patients in intensive care units, thus, it is important to know both local and international practice in accordance with law and ethical principles for intensive care physicians. Aim: To search for local customs of end of life decisions (withholding or withdrawing the therapy, shortening of the dying process), and to compare the data with the international literature. Methods: In 2007-2008 the fi rst Hungarian survey was performed with the purpose to learn more about local practice of end of life decisions. Questionnaires were sent out electronically to 743 registered members of Hungarian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. Respecting anonymity, 103 replies were statistically evaluated (response rate was 13.8%) and compared with data from other European countries. Results: As expected, it turned out from replies that the practice of domestic intensive care physicians is very paternal and this is promoted by legal regulations that share a similar character. Intensive care physicians generally make their decisions alone (3.75/5 point) without respecting the opinion of the patient (2.57/5 point) the relatives (2.14/5 point) or other medical personnel (2.37/5 point). Furthermore, they prefer not to start a therapy rather than withdraw an ongoing treatment. Nevertheless, the frequency of end of life decisions (3-9% of ICU patients) is smaller than other European countries. Conclusions: There is a need for the expansion of patients' right in our country. For end of life decisions, self determinations must be supported and a dialogue must be established between lawmakers and physicians, in order to improve the legal support of this medical practice.

AB - End of life decisions affect most of patients in intensive care units, thus, it is important to know both local and international practice in accordance with law and ethical principles for intensive care physicians. Aim: To search for local customs of end of life decisions (withholding or withdrawing the therapy, shortening of the dying process), and to compare the data with the international literature. Methods: In 2007-2008 the fi rst Hungarian survey was performed with the purpose to learn more about local practice of end of life decisions. Questionnaires were sent out electronically to 743 registered members of Hungarian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. Respecting anonymity, 103 replies were statistically evaluated (response rate was 13.8%) and compared with data from other European countries. Results: As expected, it turned out from replies that the practice of domestic intensive care physicians is very paternal and this is promoted by legal regulations that share a similar character. Intensive care physicians generally make their decisions alone (3.75/5 point) without respecting the opinion of the patient (2.57/5 point) the relatives (2.14/5 point) or other medical personnel (2.37/5 point). Furthermore, they prefer not to start a therapy rather than withdraw an ongoing treatment. Nevertheless, the frequency of end of life decisions (3-9% of ICU patients) is smaller than other European countries. Conclusions: There is a need for the expansion of patients' right in our country. For end of life decisions, self determinations must be supported and a dialogue must be established between lawmakers and physicians, in order to improve the legal support of this medical practice.

KW - bioethics

KW - end of life decisions

KW - euthanasia

KW - intensive therapy

KW - legal situation

KW - non competent patient

KW - physician assisted suicide

KW - treatment withdrawal

KW - treatment withholding

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956605201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956605201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1556/OH.2010.28950

DO - 10.1556/OH.2010.28950

M3 - Article

C2 - 20826377

AN - SCOPUS:77956605201

VL - 151

SP - 1530

EP - 1536

JO - Orvosi Hetilap

JF - Orvosi Hetilap

SN - 0030-6002

IS - 38

ER -