Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages

István Bácsi, Viktória B-Béres, G. Vasas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are among the most well studied organisms; above all because of their ability to produce an extremely diverse array of biologically active metabolites, cyanotoxins among them. It is known that the biosynthesis of cyanotoxins requires a significant amount of energy and nutrient resources of the cyanobacterial cells. With this knowledge, the question that arises is 'what could be the functional role of these "expensive" metabolites in the ecology and distribution of cyanobacteria'. One function of the metabolites in question could be that they serve as allelochemicals. Allelopathy between phytoplankton organisms in aquatic habitats is not as well studied as between e. g. vascular plant in terrestrial systems, although it is considered as an important regulating factor of phytoplankton dynamics and community composition. The discussion of cyanotoxins as allelochemicals is a controversial issue. Some authors say that toxins have effect on several organisms, including some that may not be present in the producer immediate environment (toxicity), while allelopathic compounds play role in the interactions between the emitter organisms and their direct competitors or predators. From this point of view cyanotoxins are not specifically allelochemicals. However, a number of observations indicated allelopathic nature of cyanotoxins, so in some cases it is difficult to isolate clearly these two phenomena: toxicity and allelopathy. The issue is further complicated by the following facts: (i) A natural cyanobacterial population is a mixture of toxin producer and non-producer ecotypes in most cases; (ii) the release of cyanotoxins varies in a very wide range, usually they are released in the surrounding water only in small amounts by living cells. Most recently new hypotheses arise according to which cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, especially cyanotoxins can serve as signal molecules among the cells within one or different genera. Thus, despite the increscent number of studies the question about the role of cyanotoxins still remained mostly unanswered. This chapter will discuss the existing evidence for the roles of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, mainly toxins, in the interactions of phytoplankton species; trying to highlight the functions of these compounds in dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages1-26
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9781624179662
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Phytoplankton
Metabolites
Pheromones
Cyanobacteria
Allelopathy
Toxicity
Ecotype
Aquatic Organisms
Ecology
Biosynthesis
Ecosystem
Blood Vessels
Nutrients
Food
Cells
Water
Molecules
Population
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Bácsi, I., B-Béres, V., & Vasas, G. (2013). Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages. In Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management (pp. 1-26). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages. / Bácsi, István; B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, G.

Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. p. 1-26.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bácsi, I, B-Béres, V & Vasas, G 2013, Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages. in Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 1-26.
Bácsi I, B-Béres V, Vasas G. Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages. In Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2013. p. 1-26
Bácsi, István ; B-Béres, Viktória ; Vasas, G. / Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages. Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013. pp. 1-26
@inbook{ad8463ad50054b518902c2d93a2e0f79,
title = "Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages",
abstract = "Cyanobacteria ({"}blue-green algae{"}) are among the most well studied organisms; above all because of their ability to produce an extremely diverse array of biologically active metabolites, cyanotoxins among them. It is known that the biosynthesis of cyanotoxins requires a significant amount of energy and nutrient resources of the cyanobacterial cells. With this knowledge, the question that arises is 'what could be the functional role of these {"}expensive{"} metabolites in the ecology and distribution of cyanobacteria'. One function of the metabolites in question could be that they serve as allelochemicals. Allelopathy between phytoplankton organisms in aquatic habitats is not as well studied as between e. g. vascular plant in terrestrial systems, although it is considered as an important regulating factor of phytoplankton dynamics and community composition. The discussion of cyanotoxins as allelochemicals is a controversial issue. Some authors say that toxins have effect on several organisms, including some that may not be present in the producer immediate environment (toxicity), while allelopathic compounds play role in the interactions between the emitter organisms and their direct competitors or predators. From this point of view cyanotoxins are not specifically allelochemicals. However, a number of observations indicated allelopathic nature of cyanotoxins, so in some cases it is difficult to isolate clearly these two phenomena: toxicity and allelopathy. The issue is further complicated by the following facts: (i) A natural cyanobacterial population is a mixture of toxin producer and non-producer ecotypes in most cases; (ii) the release of cyanotoxins varies in a very wide range, usually they are released in the surrounding water only in small amounts by living cells. Most recently new hypotheses arise according to which cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, especially cyanotoxins can serve as signal molecules among the cells within one or different genera. Thus, despite the increscent number of studies the question about the role of cyanotoxins still remained mostly unanswered. This chapter will discuss the existing evidence for the roles of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, mainly toxins, in the interactions of phytoplankton species; trying to highlight the functions of these compounds in dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages.",
author = "Istv{\'a}n B{\'a}csi and Vikt{\'o}ria B-B{\'e}res and G. Vasas",
year = "2013",
month = "5",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781624179662",
pages = "1--26",
booktitle = "Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management",
publisher = "Nova Science Publishers, Inc.",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Possible roles of cyanotoxins of species interactions of phytoplankton assemblages

AU - Bácsi, István

AU - B-Béres, Viktória

AU - Vasas, G.

PY - 2013/5

Y1 - 2013/5

N2 - Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are among the most well studied organisms; above all because of their ability to produce an extremely diverse array of biologically active metabolites, cyanotoxins among them. It is known that the biosynthesis of cyanotoxins requires a significant amount of energy and nutrient resources of the cyanobacterial cells. With this knowledge, the question that arises is 'what could be the functional role of these "expensive" metabolites in the ecology and distribution of cyanobacteria'. One function of the metabolites in question could be that they serve as allelochemicals. Allelopathy between phytoplankton organisms in aquatic habitats is not as well studied as between e. g. vascular plant in terrestrial systems, although it is considered as an important regulating factor of phytoplankton dynamics and community composition. The discussion of cyanotoxins as allelochemicals is a controversial issue. Some authors say that toxins have effect on several organisms, including some that may not be present in the producer immediate environment (toxicity), while allelopathic compounds play role in the interactions between the emitter organisms and their direct competitors or predators. From this point of view cyanotoxins are not specifically allelochemicals. However, a number of observations indicated allelopathic nature of cyanotoxins, so in some cases it is difficult to isolate clearly these two phenomena: toxicity and allelopathy. The issue is further complicated by the following facts: (i) A natural cyanobacterial population is a mixture of toxin producer and non-producer ecotypes in most cases; (ii) the release of cyanotoxins varies in a very wide range, usually they are released in the surrounding water only in small amounts by living cells. Most recently new hypotheses arise according to which cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, especially cyanotoxins can serve as signal molecules among the cells within one or different genera. Thus, despite the increscent number of studies the question about the role of cyanotoxins still remained mostly unanswered. This chapter will discuss the existing evidence for the roles of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, mainly toxins, in the interactions of phytoplankton species; trying to highlight the functions of these compounds in dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages.

AB - Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are among the most well studied organisms; above all because of their ability to produce an extremely diverse array of biologically active metabolites, cyanotoxins among them. It is known that the biosynthesis of cyanotoxins requires a significant amount of energy and nutrient resources of the cyanobacterial cells. With this knowledge, the question that arises is 'what could be the functional role of these "expensive" metabolites in the ecology and distribution of cyanobacteria'. One function of the metabolites in question could be that they serve as allelochemicals. Allelopathy between phytoplankton organisms in aquatic habitats is not as well studied as between e. g. vascular plant in terrestrial systems, although it is considered as an important regulating factor of phytoplankton dynamics and community composition. The discussion of cyanotoxins as allelochemicals is a controversial issue. Some authors say that toxins have effect on several organisms, including some that may not be present in the producer immediate environment (toxicity), while allelopathic compounds play role in the interactions between the emitter organisms and their direct competitors or predators. From this point of view cyanotoxins are not specifically allelochemicals. However, a number of observations indicated allelopathic nature of cyanotoxins, so in some cases it is difficult to isolate clearly these two phenomena: toxicity and allelopathy. The issue is further complicated by the following facts: (i) A natural cyanobacterial population is a mixture of toxin producer and non-producer ecotypes in most cases; (ii) the release of cyanotoxins varies in a very wide range, usually they are released in the surrounding water only in small amounts by living cells. Most recently new hypotheses arise according to which cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, especially cyanotoxins can serve as signal molecules among the cells within one or different genera. Thus, despite the increscent number of studies the question about the role of cyanotoxins still remained mostly unanswered. This chapter will discuss the existing evidence for the roles of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites, mainly toxins, in the interactions of phytoplankton species; trying to highlight the functions of these compounds in dynamics of phytoplankton assemblages.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892056000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892056000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84892056000

SN - 9781624179662

SP - 1

EP - 26

BT - Cyanobacteria: Ecology, Toxicology and Management

PB - Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

ER -