Possible influence of neighbours on stereotypic behaviour in horses

Krisztina Nagy, Anikó Schrott, P. Kabai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revealing risk factors of abnormal stereotypic behaviour (ASB) in horses can help in the design of protective measures. Previous epidemiological studies indicate that social isolation, housing, management conditions, and feeding regime have a strong effect on developing ASB. The common belief that exposure to a stereotypic horse increases the risk of ASB has never been substantiated. Here we report that a generalised linear mixed models (GLMM) analysis of data on 287 horses of nine riding schools revealed that exposure to a stereotypic neighbour is a significant risk factor for performing stereotypy. Also, aggressive behaviour towards other horses increased the odds of stereotypy in the aggressor. These correspondences are unlikely to be a riding-school effect, because riding schools were treated as random factor in the GLMM. Risk factors identified by epidemiological studies cannot be treated as causal agents without independent evidence. Our aim in presenting these findings was to draw attention to the possibility of neighbour effects so that other researchers would include this variable in their surveys.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-328
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume111
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Fingerprint

stereotyped behavior
abnormal behavior
Horses
horses
risk factors
epidemiological studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Linear Models
Social Isolation
aggression
data analysis
researchers
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Horse
  • Logistic mixed regression
  • Risk factors
  • Stereotypies
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Possible influence of neighbours on stereotypic behaviour in horses. / Nagy, Krisztina; Schrott, Anikó; Kabai, P.

In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Vol. 111, No. 3-4, 06.2008, p. 321-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagy, Krisztina ; Schrott, Anikó ; Kabai, P. / Possible influence of neighbours on stereotypic behaviour in horses. In: Applied Animal Behaviour Science. 2008 ; Vol. 111, No. 3-4. pp. 321-328.
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