Polyhedral molecular geometries

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

H.S.M. Coxeter has said that the chief reason for studying regular polyhedra is still the same as in the times of the Pythagoreans, namely, that their symmetrical shapes appeal to one's artistic sense. The success of modern molecular chemistry affirms the validity of this statement; there is no doubt that aesthetic appeal has contributed to the rapid development of what could be termed polyhedral chemistry. The chemist Earl Muetterties movingly described his attraction to boron hydride chemistry, comparing it to Escher's devotion to periodic drawings:

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationShaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages153-170
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)9780387927145, 0387927131, 9780387927138
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2013

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Chemistry
Appeal
Regular polyhedron
Drawing
Aesthetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematics(all)

Cite this

Hargittai, M., & Hargittai, I. (2013). Polyhedral molecular geometries. In Shaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination (pp. 153-170). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92714-5_11

Polyhedral molecular geometries. / Hargittai, M.; Hargittai, I.

Shaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination. Springer New York, 2013. p. 153-170.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hargittai, M & Hargittai, I 2013, Polyhedral molecular geometries. in Shaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination. Springer New York, pp. 153-170. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92714-5_11
Hargittai M, Hargittai I. Polyhedral molecular geometries. In Shaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination. Springer New York. 2013. p. 153-170 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-92714-5_11
Hargittai, M. ; Hargittai, I. / Polyhedral molecular geometries. Shaping Space: Exploring Polyhedra in Nature, Art, and the Geometrical Imagination. Springer New York, 2013. pp. 153-170
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