'Poking' microtubules bring about nuclear wriggling to position nuclei

Szilard Szikora, Imre Gaspar, J. Szabad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nuclei wriggle in the cells of the follicle epithelium of the Drosophila pre-vitellogenic egg primordia. Although similar phenomena have been reported for a number of cultured cell types and some neurons in the zebrafish embryo, the mechanism and importance of the process have remained unexplained. Wriggling involves successive sudden and random minor turns of the nuclei, approximately three twists per minute with roughly 12° per twist, one of which lasts typically for 14 seconds. Wriggling is generated by the growing microtubules seeded throughout the cell cortex, which, while poking the nuclei, buckle and exert 40-5 piconewtons over ,16 seconds. While wriggling, the nuclei drift ,5 mm in a day in the immensely growing follicle cells along the apical-basal axis from the apical to the basal cell region. A >2-fold excess of the microtubules nucleated in the apical cell region, as compared with those seeded in the basal cell cortex, makes the nuclei drift along the apical-basal axis. Nuclear wriggling and positioning appear to be tightly related processes: they cease simultaneously when the nuclei become anchored by the actin cytoskeleton; moreover, colchicine or taxol treatment eliminates both nuclear wriggling and positioning. We propose that the wriggling nuclei reveal a thus far undescribed nuclear positioning mechanism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-262
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume126
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

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Microtubules
Colchicine
Zebrafish
Paclitaxel
Actin Cytoskeleton
Drosophila
Ovum
Cultured Cells
Embryonic Structures
Epithelium
Neurons

Keywords

  • Drosophila
  • Follicle cells
  • Microtubules
  • Nuclear positioning
  • Nuclei

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

'Poking' microtubules bring about nuclear wriggling to position nuclei. / Szikora, Szilard; Gaspar, Imre; Szabad, J.

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 126, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 254-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szikora, Szilard ; Gaspar, Imre ; Szabad, J. / 'Poking' microtubules bring about nuclear wriggling to position nuclei. In: Journal of Cell Science. 2013 ; Vol. 126, No. 1. pp. 254-262.
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