PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study

Gerard Hoek, Sam Pattenden, Saskia Willers, Temenuga Antova, Eleonora Fabianova, Charlotte Braun-Fahrländer, Francesco Forastiere, Ulrike Gehring, Heike Luttmann-Gibson, Leticia Grize, Joachim Heinrich, Danny Houthuijs, Nicole Janssen, Boris Katsnelson, Anna Kosheleva, Hanns Moshammer, Manfred Neuberger, Larisa Privalova, P. Rudnai, Frank Speizer & 4 others Hana Slachtova, Hana Tomaskova, Renata Zlotkowska, Tony Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of the impact of long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution on the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and lung function in children have yielded mixed results, partly related to differences in study design, exposure assessment, confounder selection and data analysis. We assembled respiratory health and exposure data for >45,000 children from comparable crosssectional studies in 12 countries. 11 respiratory symptoms were selected, for which comparable questions were asked. Spirometry was performed in about half of the children. Exposure to air pollution was mainly characterised by annual average concentrations of particulate matter with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10) measured at fixed sites within the study areas. Positive associations were found between the average PM10 concentration and the prevalence of phlegm (OR per 10 μg·m-3 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.30), hay fever (OR 1.20, 95% CI 0.99-1.46), bronchitis (OR 1.08, 95% CI 0.98-1.19), morning cough (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.02-1.29) and nocturnal cough (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.98-1.29). There were no associations with diagnosed asthma or asthma symptoms. PM10 was not associated with lung function across all studies combined. Our study adds to the evidence that long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution, characterised by the concentration of PM10, is associated with increased respiratory symptoms. Copyright

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)538-547
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2012

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Air Pollution
Cough
Lung
Asthma
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Particulate Matter
Bronchitis
Spirometry
Health

Keywords

  • Child
  • Lung function
  • Nitrogen dioxide
  • Particulate matter
  • Respiratory symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Hoek, G., Pattenden, S., Willers, S., Antova, T., Fabianova, E., Braun-Fahrländer, C., ... Fletcher, T. (2012). PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study. European Respiratory Journal, 40(3), 538-547. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00002611

PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study. / Hoek, Gerard; Pattenden, Sam; Willers, Saskia; Antova, Temenuga; Fabianova, Eleonora; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Forastiere, Francesco; Gehring, Ulrike; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Grize, Leticia; Heinrich, Joachim; Houthuijs, Danny; Janssen, Nicole; Katsnelson, Boris; Kosheleva, Anna; Moshammer, Hanns; Neuberger, Manfred; Privalova, Larisa; Rudnai, P.; Speizer, Frank; Slachtova, Hana; Tomaskova, Hana; Zlotkowska, Renata; Fletcher, Tony.

In: European Respiratory Journal, Vol. 40, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 538-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoek, G, Pattenden, S, Willers, S, Antova, T, Fabianova, E, Braun-Fahrländer, C, Forastiere, F, Gehring, U, Luttmann-Gibson, H, Grize, L, Heinrich, J, Houthuijs, D, Janssen, N, Katsnelson, B, Kosheleva, A, Moshammer, H, Neuberger, M, Privalova, L, Rudnai, P, Speizer, F, Slachtova, H, Tomaskova, H, Zlotkowska, R & Fletcher, T 2012, 'PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study', European Respiratory Journal, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 538-547. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00002611
Hoek G, Pattenden S, Willers S, Antova T, Fabianova E, Braun-Fahrländer C et al. PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study. European Respiratory Journal. 2012 Sep 1;40(3):538-547. https://doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00002611
Hoek, Gerard ; Pattenden, Sam ; Willers, Saskia ; Antova, Temenuga ; Fabianova, Eleonora ; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte ; Forastiere, Francesco ; Gehring, Ulrike ; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike ; Grize, Leticia ; Heinrich, Joachim ; Houthuijs, Danny ; Janssen, Nicole ; Katsnelson, Boris ; Kosheleva, Anna ; Moshammer, Hanns ; Neuberger, Manfred ; Privalova, Larisa ; Rudnai, P. ; Speizer, Frank ; Slachtova, Hana ; Tomaskova, Hana ; Zlotkowska, Renata ; Fletcher, Tony. / PM10, and children's respiratory symptoms and lung function in the PATY study. In: European Respiratory Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 40, No. 3. pp. 538-547.
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