Platelet aggregometry testing: Molecular mechanisms, techniques and clinical implications

Katalin Koltai, Gabor Kesmarky, G. Fehér, Antal Tibold, K. Tóth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Platelets play a fundamental role in normal hemostasis, while their inherited or acquired dysfunctions are involved in a variety of bleeding disorders or thrombotic events. Several laboratory methodologies or point-of-care testing methods are currently available for clinical and experimental settings. These methods describe different aspects of platelet function based on platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion, the viscoelastic properties during clot formation, the evaluation of thromboxane metabolism or certain flow cytometry techniques. Platelet aggregometry is applied in different clinical settings as monitoring response to antiplatelet therapies, the assessment of perioperative bleeding risk, the diagnosis of inherited bleeding disorders or in transfusion medicine. The rationale for platelet function-driven antiplatelet therapy was based on the result of several studies on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where an association between high platelet reactivity despite P2Y12 inhibition and ischemic events as stent thrombosis or cardiovascular death was found. However, recent large scale randomized, controlled trials have consistently failed to demonstrate a benefit of personalised antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function testing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1803
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 18 2017

Fingerprint

Platelets
platelets
Blood Platelets
Testing
bleeding
therapy
Hemorrhage
Transfusion Medicine
hemostatics
transfusion
disorders
thrombosis
Thromboxanes
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Stents
cytometry
Flow cytometry
Hemostasis
Platelet Aggregation
metabolism

Keywords

  • Aggregometry
  • Aspirin
  • Clopidogrel
  • Platelet aggregation
  • Platelet function disorders
  • Tailored antiplatelet therapy
  • Thienopyridines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

Platelet aggregometry testing : Molecular mechanisms, techniques and clinical implications. / Koltai, Katalin; Kesmarky, Gabor; Fehér, G.; Tibold, Antal; Tóth, K.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 8, 1803, 18.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{d4c08147f22c4cfbba04c5df32039d96,
title = "Platelet aggregometry testing: Molecular mechanisms, techniques and clinical implications",
abstract = "Platelets play a fundamental role in normal hemostasis, while their inherited or acquired dysfunctions are involved in a variety of bleeding disorders or thrombotic events. Several laboratory methodologies or point-of-care testing methods are currently available for clinical and experimental settings. These methods describe different aspects of platelet function based on platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion, the viscoelastic properties during clot formation, the evaluation of thromboxane metabolism or certain flow cytometry techniques. Platelet aggregometry is applied in different clinical settings as monitoring response to antiplatelet therapies, the assessment of perioperative bleeding risk, the diagnosis of inherited bleeding disorders or in transfusion medicine. The rationale for platelet function-driven antiplatelet therapy was based on the result of several studies on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where an association between high platelet reactivity despite P2Y12 inhibition and ischemic events as stent thrombosis or cardiovascular death was found. However, recent large scale randomized, controlled trials have consistently failed to demonstrate a benefit of personalised antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function testing.",
keywords = "Aggregometry, Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Platelet aggregation, Platelet function disorders, Tailored antiplatelet therapy, Thienopyridines",
author = "Katalin Koltai and Gabor Kesmarky and G. Feh{\'e}r and Antal Tibold and K. T{\'o}th",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "18",
doi = "10.3390/ijms18081803",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
journal = "International Journal of Molecular Sciences",
issn = "1661-6596",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Platelet aggregometry testing

T2 - Molecular mechanisms, techniques and clinical implications

AU - Koltai, Katalin

AU - Kesmarky, Gabor

AU - Fehér, G.

AU - Tibold, Antal

AU - Tóth, K.

PY - 2017/8/18

Y1 - 2017/8/18

N2 - Platelets play a fundamental role in normal hemostasis, while their inherited or acquired dysfunctions are involved in a variety of bleeding disorders or thrombotic events. Several laboratory methodologies or point-of-care testing methods are currently available for clinical and experimental settings. These methods describe different aspects of platelet function based on platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion, the viscoelastic properties during clot formation, the evaluation of thromboxane metabolism or certain flow cytometry techniques. Platelet aggregometry is applied in different clinical settings as monitoring response to antiplatelet therapies, the assessment of perioperative bleeding risk, the diagnosis of inherited bleeding disorders or in transfusion medicine. The rationale for platelet function-driven antiplatelet therapy was based on the result of several studies on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where an association between high platelet reactivity despite P2Y12 inhibition and ischemic events as stent thrombosis or cardiovascular death was found. However, recent large scale randomized, controlled trials have consistently failed to demonstrate a benefit of personalised antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function testing.

AB - Platelets play a fundamental role in normal hemostasis, while their inherited or acquired dysfunctions are involved in a variety of bleeding disorders or thrombotic events. Several laboratory methodologies or point-of-care testing methods are currently available for clinical and experimental settings. These methods describe different aspects of platelet function based on platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion, the viscoelastic properties during clot formation, the evaluation of thromboxane metabolism or certain flow cytometry techniques. Platelet aggregometry is applied in different clinical settings as monitoring response to antiplatelet therapies, the assessment of perioperative bleeding risk, the diagnosis of inherited bleeding disorders or in transfusion medicine. The rationale for platelet function-driven antiplatelet therapy was based on the result of several studies on patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where an association between high platelet reactivity despite P2Y12 inhibition and ischemic events as stent thrombosis or cardiovascular death was found. However, recent large scale randomized, controlled trials have consistently failed to demonstrate a benefit of personalised antiplatelet therapy based on platelet function testing.

KW - Aggregometry

KW - Aspirin

KW - Clopidogrel

KW - Platelet aggregation

KW - Platelet function disorders

KW - Tailored antiplatelet therapy

KW - Thienopyridines

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028043844&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028043844&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijms18081803

DO - 10.3390/ijms18081803

M3 - Review article

C2 - 28820484

AN - SCOPUS:85028043844

VL - 18

JO - International Journal of Molecular Sciences

JF - International Journal of Molecular Sciences

SN - 1661-6596

IS - 8

M1 - 1803

ER -