Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance

L. Szabados, Hajnalka Kovács, Aviah Zilberstein, Alain Bouchereau

Research output: Book/ReportBook

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extreme environmental conditions such as drought, cold or high soil salinity impede plant growth and require specific adaptation capacity. In response to environmental stresses, a number of low-molecular-weight compounds can accumulate in plants: protective amino acids, sugar alcohols, sugars and betaine-type quaternary amines. The function of these compounds includes the stabilisation of cellular structures, photosynthetic complexes, specific enzymes and other macromolecules, the scavenging of reactive oxygen species or acting as metabolic signals in stress conditions. Although a correlation between the accumulation of certain osmoprotective compounds and stress tolerance certainly exists, a causal relationship between osmolyte accumulation and enhanced tolerance could not always be confirmed. Nevertheless, the importance of osmoprotective compounds for the adaptation to extreme environmental conditions is supported by numerous studies obtained with natural variants, mutants or transgenic plants with different capabilities to accumulate these metabolites. Combining genetic analysis with metabolic profiling approaches could considerably increase our understanding of plant stress responses and the importance of the protective metabolites in the adaptation to stress conditions.

Original languageEnglish
PublisherUnknown Publisher
Number of pages46
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Publication series

NameAdvances in Botanical Research
Volume57
ISSN (Print)00652296

Fingerprint

stress tolerance
metabolites
sugar alcohols
environmental factors
plant stress
cell structures
betaine
metabolomics
soil salinity
amines
genetic techniques and protocols
transgenic plants
reactive oxygen species
stress response
drought
plant growth
molecular weight
sugars
mutants
amino acids

Keywords

  • Environmental stress
  • Glycine betaine
  • Mannitol
  • Pinitol
  • Proline
  • Protective compound
  • Trehalose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Szabados, L., Kovács, H., Zilberstein, A., & Bouchereau, A. (2011). Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance. (Advances in Botanical Research; Vol. 57). Unknown Publisher. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-387692-8.00004-7

Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance. / Szabados, L.; Kovács, Hajnalka; Zilberstein, Aviah; Bouchereau, Alain.

Unknown Publisher, 2011. 46 p. (Advances in Botanical Research; Vol. 57).

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Szabados, L, Kovács, H, Zilberstein, A & Bouchereau, A 2011, Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance. Advances in Botanical Research, vol. 57, vol. 57, Unknown Publisher. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-387692-8.00004-7
Szabados L, Kovács H, Zilberstein A, Bouchereau A. Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance. Unknown Publisher, 2011. 46 p. (Advances in Botanical Research). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-387692-8.00004-7
Szabados, L. ; Kovács, Hajnalka ; Zilberstein, Aviah ; Bouchereau, Alain. / Plants in Extreme Environments. Importance of Protective Compounds in Stress Tolerance. Unknown Publisher, 2011. 46 p. (Advances in Botanical Research).
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