Physiological and biochemical aspects of cadmium toxicity and protective mechanisms induced in Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia

Erika Fediuc, L. Erdei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The capability of common reed and cattail (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. and Typha latifolia L.) to accumulate and translocate Cd2+ from roots to shoots and their defense mechanisms induced by Cd2+ at the levels of thiol metabolism and antioxidant enzyme activity were studied. Experiments were carried out using young, small sized plants grown hydroponically and originating either from regenerating tissue culture (reed) or aseptically germinated seeds (cattail). Cadmium treatment was applied as a concentration series between 0.1 and 100 μmol/L for 40 and 100 days for reed and cattail, respectively. For assays and analysis, plant samples were taken in 2-4 week intervals. Most of the Cd2+ taken up was retained in roots in both species, however, Typha accumulated more cadmium in the shoot compared to Phragmites. In Typha, increasing accumulation of cadmium was in positive correlation with the increase of free thiol content while in Phragmites increased glutathione reductase, catalase and peroxidase activities were found. It is shown for the first time that under Cd2+ stress different defense strategies operate in Typha and Phragmites. In Typha, this strategy relies more on thiol induction and metal binding leading to heavy metal avoidance, while in Phragmites it is based on increased antioxidant enzyme activities and thus scavenging of active oxygen species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-271
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plant Physiology
Volume159
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Typhaceae
Typha latifolia
Phragmites
Typha
Phragmites australis
Cadmium
cadmium
thiols
toxicity
Sulfhydryl Compounds
enzyme activity
antioxidants
shoots
glutathione-disulfide reductase
defense mechanisms
tissue culture
catalase
peroxidase
heavy metals
Antioxidants

Keywords

  • Antioxidant enzymes
  • Cadmium
  • Glutathione reductase
  • Phragmites australis
  • Thiol levels
  • Typha latifolia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

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T1 - Physiological and biochemical aspects of cadmium toxicity and protective mechanisms induced in Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia

AU - Fediuc, Erika

AU - Erdei, L.

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N2 - The capability of common reed and cattail (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. and Typha latifolia L.) to accumulate and translocate Cd2+ from roots to shoots and their defense mechanisms induced by Cd2+ at the levels of thiol metabolism and antioxidant enzyme activity were studied. Experiments were carried out using young, small sized plants grown hydroponically and originating either from regenerating tissue culture (reed) or aseptically germinated seeds (cattail). Cadmium treatment was applied as a concentration series between 0.1 and 100 μmol/L for 40 and 100 days for reed and cattail, respectively. For assays and analysis, plant samples were taken in 2-4 week intervals. Most of the Cd2+ taken up was retained in roots in both species, however, Typha accumulated more cadmium in the shoot compared to Phragmites. In Typha, increasing accumulation of cadmium was in positive correlation with the increase of free thiol content while in Phragmites increased glutathione reductase, catalase and peroxidase activities were found. It is shown for the first time that under Cd2+ stress different defense strategies operate in Typha and Phragmites. In Typha, this strategy relies more on thiol induction and metal binding leading to heavy metal avoidance, while in Phragmites it is based on increased antioxidant enzyme activities and thus scavenging of active oxygen species.

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