Physicochemical and ultrastructural properties of cholesterol esters bound to elastin

M. Bihari-Varga, A. Kádár, M. P. Jacob, L. Robert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Physicochemical and ultrastructural properties of cholesterol ester complexes of fibrous elastin and of K-elastin were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron-microscopy. The number of molecules of the different fatty acids retained in these elastin complexes varied between large limits according to the nature of the fatty acid of the cholesterol ester, ranging from 0.1 μg/ 200mg of elastin for cholesterol arachidonate to 48μg/200mg elastin for cholesterol palmitate. The ultrastructural studies confirmed the association of cholesterol esters with fibrous elastin and soluble K-elastin. The DSC-data showed that the temperature of transition between the crystalline and the liquid crystalline state shifts towards higher temperatures (well above body temperature) when cholesterol esters are bound to elastin: no liquid crystalline mesophase was observed in cholesterol oleate or linoleate-elastin complexes at 37°C; melting of the crystalline structures took place at 51°C and at 42°C for the cholester Holeate and linoleate-elastin complexes respectively. These results indicate that in the elastin-bound form the crystalline-liquid crystalline transition is inhibited. The "stabilization" of the crystalline structure of cholesterol esters by fibrous elastin may be of biological significance and account for the crystalline deposits seen in advanced atherosclerotic lesions at sites of elastic fiber breakdown.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-55
Number of pages13
JournalConnective Tissue Research
Volume15
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Elastin
Cholesterol Esters
Crystalline materials
Differential Scanning Calorimetry
Linoleic Acid
Differential scanning calorimetry
Liquids
Fatty Acids
Cholesterol
Elastic Tissue
Transition Temperature
Palmitates
Body Temperature
Temperature
Electron microscopy
Freezing
Electron Microscopy
Melting
Deposits
Stabilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Physicochemical and ultrastructural properties of cholesterol esters bound to elastin. / Bihari-Varga, M.; Kádár, A.; Jacob, M. P.; Robert, L.

In: Connective Tissue Research, Vol. 15, No. 1-2, 1986, p. 43-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bihari-Varga, M. ; Kádár, A. ; Jacob, M. P. ; Robert, L. / Physicochemical and ultrastructural properties of cholesterol esters bound to elastin. In: Connective Tissue Research. 1986 ; Vol. 15, No. 1-2. pp. 43-55.
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