Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents

Findings from two observational studies

Francisco B. Ortega, Jonatan R. Ruiz, Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf, Aline Meirhaeghe, Marcela González-Gross, Luis A. Moreno, D. Molnár, Anthony Kafatos, Frederic Gottrand, Kurt Widhalm, Idoia Labayen, Michael Sjöström

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine whether physical activity influences the association between birth weight and insulin resistance in adolescents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The study comprised adolescents who participated in two cross-sectional studies: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study (n = 520, mean age = 14.6 years) and the Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) (n = 269, mean age = 15.6 years). Participants had valid data on birth weight (parental recall), BMI, sexual maturation, maternal education, breastfeeding, physical activity (accelerometry, counts/minute), fasting glucose, and insulin. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Maternal education level and breastfeeding duration were reported by the mothers. RESULTS - There was a significant interaction of physical activity in the association between birth weight and HOMA-IR (logarithmically transformed) in both the HELENA study and the EYHS (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively), after adjusting for sex, age, sexual maturation, BMI, maternal education level, and breastfeeding duration. Stratified analyses by physical activity levels (below/above median) showed a borderline inverse association between birth weight and HOMA-IR in the low-active group (standardized β = -0.094, P = 0.09, and standardized β = -0.156, P = 0.06, for HELENA and EYHS, respectively), whereas no evidence of association was found in the high-active group (standardized β = -0.031, P = 0.62, and standardized β = 0.053, P = 0.55, for HELENA and EYHS, respectively). CONCLUSIONS - Higher levels of physical activity may attenuate the adverse effects of low birth weight on insulin sensitivity in adolescents. More observational data, from larger and more powerful studies, are required to test these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2295-2299
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes
Volume60
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Low Birth Weight Infant
Observational Studies
Insulin Resistance
Exercise
Birth Weight
Breast Feeding
Mothers
Sexual Maturation
Homeostasis
Education
Accelerometry
Fasting
Research Design
Cross-Sectional Studies
Insulin
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Ortega, F. B., Ruiz, J. R., Hurtig-Wennlöf, A., Meirhaeghe, A., González-Gross, M., Moreno, L. A., ... Sjöström, M. (2011). Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents: Findings from two observational studies. Diabetes, 60(9), 2295-2299. https://doi.org/10.2337/db10-1670

Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents : Findings from two observational studies. / Ortega, Francisco B.; Ruiz, Jonatan R.; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita; Meirhaeghe, Aline; González-Gross, Marcela; Moreno, Luis A.; Molnár, D.; Kafatos, Anthony; Gottrand, Frederic; Widhalm, Kurt; Labayen, Idoia; Sjöström, Michael.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 60, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 2295-2299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortega, FB, Ruiz, JR, Hurtig-Wennlöf, A, Meirhaeghe, A, González-Gross, M, Moreno, LA, Molnár, D, Kafatos, A, Gottrand, F, Widhalm, K, Labayen, I & Sjöström, M 2011, 'Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents: Findings from two observational studies', Diabetes, vol. 60, no. 9, pp. 2295-2299. https://doi.org/10.2337/db10-1670
Ortega FB, Ruiz JR, Hurtig-Wennlöf A, Meirhaeghe A, González-Gross M, Moreno LA et al. Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents: Findings from two observational studies. Diabetes. 2011 Sep;60(9):2295-2299. https://doi.org/10.2337/db10-1670
Ortega, Francisco B. ; Ruiz, Jonatan R. ; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita ; Meirhaeghe, Aline ; González-Gross, Marcela ; Moreno, Luis A. ; Molnár, D. ; Kafatos, Anthony ; Gottrand, Frederic ; Widhalm, Kurt ; Labayen, Idoia ; Sjöström, Michael. / Physical activity attenuates the effect of low birth weight on insulin resistance in adolescents : Findings from two observational studies. In: Diabetes. 2011 ; Vol. 60, No. 9. pp. 2295-2299.
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