Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Lethrus (Coleoptera

Geotrupidae) reveal contrasting evolutionary history in Europe

János P. Tóth, Judit Bereczki, Rita Rácz, Z. Varga, Z. Barta, Gábor Sramkó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study we analysed for the first time the phylogenetic relationships among the European Lethrus species based on mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (H3, wingless) markers. The phylogenetic inference based on these genes indicated that the European Lethrus species form a monophyletic group with two main lineages. One of them is distributed in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula (North Macedonia, northwestern Greece and southwestern Bulgaria) and includes five species (L. perun, L. raymondi, L. strymonensis, L. halkidikiensis and L. elephas). Three species of the other clade (L. schaumii, L. ares and L. schneideri) occur in the eastern part of the Balkan Peninsula (southeastern Bulgaria and northeastern Greece) while its fourth member, L. apterus, could colonize much larger areas in central and eastern Europe. Despite its large geographic distribution, L. apterus proved to be a single species. By contrast, we found strong intraspecific differentiation in both L. schaumii and L. halkidikiensis in spite of their restricted distribution. Surprisingly, two highly divergent mitogroups were also detected within a single L. schneideri population. As the microsatellite markers did not show any differentiation between them, this finding is likely to be accounted for by a unidirectional hybridization event. These findings highlight that phylogenetic studies or species descriptions should not be based on mitochondrial markers alone. Our study clearly demonstrates that allopatric speciation is the most important speciation mechanism in the European species of the genus Lethrus, although we also hypothesize that other well-known factors, such as hybridization or the glacial-interglacial dynamics, could significantly affect the speciation patterns of certain lineages.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSystematic Entomology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Geotrupidae
Balkans
Bulgaria
Coleoptera
phylogenetics
Greece
history
phylogeny
hybridization
Elephas
allopatric speciation
Macedonia
Eastern European region
Central European region
geographical distribution
microsatellite repeats
Europe
interglacial
genes
gene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Lethrus (Coleoptera : Geotrupidae) reveal contrasting evolutionary history in Europe. / Tóth, János P.; Bereczki, Judit; Rácz, Rita; Varga, Z.; Barta, Z.; Sramkó, Gábor.

In: Systematic Entomology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3b9df420998b43bda76fed38ed0e051e,
title = "Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Lethrus (Coleoptera: Geotrupidae) reveal contrasting evolutionary history in Europe",
abstract = "In this study we analysed for the first time the phylogenetic relationships among the European Lethrus species based on mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (H3, wingless) markers. The phylogenetic inference based on these genes indicated that the European Lethrus species form a monophyletic group with two main lineages. One of them is distributed in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula (North Macedonia, northwestern Greece and southwestern Bulgaria) and includes five species (L. perun, L. raymondi, L. strymonensis, L. halkidikiensis and L. elephas). Three species of the other clade (L. schaumii, L. ares and L. schneideri) occur in the eastern part of the Balkan Peninsula (southeastern Bulgaria and northeastern Greece) while its fourth member, L. apterus, could colonize much larger areas in central and eastern Europe. Despite its large geographic distribution, L. apterus proved to be a single species. By contrast, we found strong intraspecific differentiation in both L. schaumii and L. halkidikiensis in spite of their restricted distribution. Surprisingly, two highly divergent mitogroups were also detected within a single L. schneideri population. As the microsatellite markers did not show any differentiation between them, this finding is likely to be accounted for by a unidirectional hybridization event. These findings highlight that phylogenetic studies or species descriptions should not be based on mitochondrial markers alone. Our study clearly demonstrates that allopatric speciation is the most important speciation mechanism in the European species of the genus Lethrus, although we also hypothesize that other well-known factors, such as hybridization or the glacial-interglacial dynamics, could significantly affect the speciation patterns of certain lineages.",
author = "T{\'o}th, {J{\'a}nos P.} and Judit Bereczki and Rita R{\'a}cz and Z. Varga and Z. Barta and G{\'a}bor Sramk{\'o}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/syen.12364",
language = "English",
journal = "Systematic Entomology",
issn = "0307-6970",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Lethrus (Coleoptera

T2 - Geotrupidae) reveal contrasting evolutionary history in Europe

AU - Tóth, János P.

AU - Bereczki, Judit

AU - Rácz, Rita

AU - Varga, Z.

AU - Barta, Z.

AU - Sramkó, Gábor

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - In this study we analysed for the first time the phylogenetic relationships among the European Lethrus species based on mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (H3, wingless) markers. The phylogenetic inference based on these genes indicated that the European Lethrus species form a monophyletic group with two main lineages. One of them is distributed in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula (North Macedonia, northwestern Greece and southwestern Bulgaria) and includes five species (L. perun, L. raymondi, L. strymonensis, L. halkidikiensis and L. elephas). Three species of the other clade (L. schaumii, L. ares and L. schneideri) occur in the eastern part of the Balkan Peninsula (southeastern Bulgaria and northeastern Greece) while its fourth member, L. apterus, could colonize much larger areas in central and eastern Europe. Despite its large geographic distribution, L. apterus proved to be a single species. By contrast, we found strong intraspecific differentiation in both L. schaumii and L. halkidikiensis in spite of their restricted distribution. Surprisingly, two highly divergent mitogroups were also detected within a single L. schneideri population. As the microsatellite markers did not show any differentiation between them, this finding is likely to be accounted for by a unidirectional hybridization event. These findings highlight that phylogenetic studies or species descriptions should not be based on mitochondrial markers alone. Our study clearly demonstrates that allopatric speciation is the most important speciation mechanism in the European species of the genus Lethrus, although we also hypothesize that other well-known factors, such as hybridization or the glacial-interglacial dynamics, could significantly affect the speciation patterns of certain lineages.

AB - In this study we analysed for the first time the phylogenetic relationships among the European Lethrus species based on mitochondrial (COI, 16S) and nuclear (H3, wingless) markers. The phylogenetic inference based on these genes indicated that the European Lethrus species form a monophyletic group with two main lineages. One of them is distributed in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula (North Macedonia, northwestern Greece and southwestern Bulgaria) and includes five species (L. perun, L. raymondi, L. strymonensis, L. halkidikiensis and L. elephas). Three species of the other clade (L. schaumii, L. ares and L. schneideri) occur in the eastern part of the Balkan Peninsula (southeastern Bulgaria and northeastern Greece) while its fourth member, L. apterus, could colonize much larger areas in central and eastern Europe. Despite its large geographic distribution, L. apterus proved to be a single species. By contrast, we found strong intraspecific differentiation in both L. schaumii and L. halkidikiensis in spite of their restricted distribution. Surprisingly, two highly divergent mitogroups were also detected within a single L. schneideri population. As the microsatellite markers did not show any differentiation between them, this finding is likely to be accounted for by a unidirectional hybridization event. These findings highlight that phylogenetic studies or species descriptions should not be based on mitochondrial markers alone. Our study clearly demonstrates that allopatric speciation is the most important speciation mechanism in the European species of the genus Lethrus, although we also hypothesize that other well-known factors, such as hybridization or the glacial-interglacial dynamics, could significantly affect the speciation patterns of certain lineages.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065097799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065097799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/syen.12364

DO - 10.1111/syen.12364

M3 - Article

JO - Systematic Entomology

JF - Systematic Entomology

SN - 0307-6970

ER -