Phycobilins and phycobiliproteins used in food industry and medicine

Beata Mysliwa-Kurdziel, K. Solymosi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Open tetrapyrroles termed phycobilins represent the major photosynthetic accessory pigments of several cyanobacteria and some eukaryotic algae such as the Glaucophyta, Cryptophyta and Rhodophyta. These pigments are covalently bound to so-called phycobiliproteins which are in general organized into phycobilisomes on the thylakoid membranes. Objective & Methods: In this work we first briefly describe the physico-chemical properties, biosynthesis, occurrence, in vivo localization and roles of the phycobilin pigments and the phycobiliproteins. Then the potential applications and uses of these pigments, pigment-protein complexes and related products by the food industry (e.g., as LinaBlue® or the so-called spirulina extract used as coloring food), by the health industry or as fluorescent dyes are critically reviewed. Conclusion: In addition to the stability, bioavailability and safety issues of purified phycobilins and phycobiliproteins, literature data about their antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective effects, and their potential use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1173-1193
Number of pages21
JournalMini-Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry
Volume17
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Phycobilins
Phycobiliproteins
Food Industry
Medicine
Glaucophyta
Cryptophyta
Phycobilisomes
Tetrapyrroles
Spirulina
Rhodophyta
Thylakoids
Photochemotherapy
Cyanobacteria
Neuroprotective Agents
Fluorescent Dyes
Biological Availability
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Antioxidants
Safety
Health

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Cancer
  • Chemoprevention
  • Food colorant
  • Phycobilins
  • Phycobiliproteins
  • Phycocyanin
  • Spirulina

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Phycobilins and phycobiliproteins used in food industry and medicine. / Mysliwa-Kurdziel, Beata; Solymosi, K.

In: Mini-Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 17, No. 13, 01.01.2017, p. 1173-1193.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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