Philadelphia chromosome and/or bcr-abl mRNA-positive primary thrombocytosis

Morphometric evidence for the transition from essential thrombocythaemia to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation

L. Pajor, L. Kereskai, K. Zsdrál, Z. Nagy, J. A. Vass, P. Jáksó, G. Radványi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The incidence, bone marrow morphology and genetic features of bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia were investigated. Methods and results: Sixty-four consecutive patients meeting the criteria of essential thrombocythaemia have been investigated for bcr-abl rearrangement and chimera mRNA expression. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated bcr-abl expression in six patients, in two of whom large fraction of the blood and bone marrow cells proved to be positive for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and conventional cytogenetic analysis. In the remaining four patients FISH analysis could not detect Ph+ cells among the blood cells, but in one of these four patients conventional cytogenetic analysis indicated a very small fraction (2%) of Ph+ mitoses in the bone marrow (bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients). In three of these four patients, X-chromosome-linked clonality assay showed that the disease is of uncommitted stem cell origin. During an average of 57 month long follow-up no transformation to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of disease or acceleration/blastic crisis could be observed in the four bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients. They did not differ significantly from typical essential thrombocythaemia patients in quantitative indices of bone marrow cellularity or the size of megakaryocytes. In these two parameters as well as in the total nucleolus organizer region area per nucleus, however, significant differences could be detected between these four as well as typical chronic myeloid leukaemia patients. Statistical analysis of the morphometric data obtained from all six Ph+ and bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients combined indicated a shift of the bone marrow morphology towards the chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation. Conclusions: These investigations indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia is infrequent among essential thrombocythaemia patients, and this condition resembles essential thrombocythaemia more than chronic myeloid leukaemia. Various expansions of the Ph+ clone appear to lead to either essential thrombocythaemia or, rather, chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation; however, data in the present study do not indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia would be a form fruste variant of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalHistopathology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Essential Thrombocythemia
Philadelphia Chromosome
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Messenger RNA
Bone Marrow
Cytogenetic Analysis
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Nucleolus Organizer Region
Statistical Data Interpretation
Megakaryocytes
X Chromosome
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Mitosis
Bone Marrow Cells
Blood Cells
Stem Cells
Clone Cells

Keywords

  • Bcr-abl
  • Essential thrombocythaemia
  • Fusion proteins
  • Myeloproliferative disorders
  • Philadelphia chromosome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Philadelphia chromosome and/or bcr-abl mRNA-positive primary thrombocytosis : Morphometric evidence for the transition from essential thrombocythaemia to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation. / Pajor, L.; Kereskai, L.; Zsdrál, K.; Nagy, Z.; Vass, J. A.; Jáksó, P.; Radványi, G.

In: Histopathology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2003, p. 53-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aims: The incidence, bone marrow morphology and genetic features of bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia were investigated. Methods and results: Sixty-four consecutive patients meeting the criteria of essential thrombocythaemia have been investigated for bcr-abl rearrangement and chimera mRNA expression. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated bcr-abl expression in six patients, in two of whom large fraction of the blood and bone marrow cells proved to be positive for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and conventional cytogenetic analysis. In the remaining four patients FISH analysis could not detect Ph+ cells among the blood cells, but in one of these four patients conventional cytogenetic analysis indicated a very small fraction (2{\%}) of Ph+ mitoses in the bone marrow (bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients). In three of these four patients, X-chromosome-linked clonality assay showed that the disease is of uncommitted stem cell origin. During an average of 57 month long follow-up no transformation to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of disease or acceleration/blastic crisis could be observed in the four bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients. They did not differ significantly from typical essential thrombocythaemia patients in quantitative indices of bone marrow cellularity or the size of megakaryocytes. In these two parameters as well as in the total nucleolus organizer region area per nucleus, however, significant differences could be detected between these four as well as typical chronic myeloid leukaemia patients. Statistical analysis of the morphometric data obtained from all six Ph+ and bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients combined indicated a shift of the bone marrow morphology towards the chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation. Conclusions: These investigations indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia is infrequent among essential thrombocythaemia patients, and this condition resembles essential thrombocythaemia more than chronic myeloid leukaemia. Various expansions of the Ph+ clone appear to lead to either essential thrombocythaemia or, rather, chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation; however, data in the present study do not indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia would be a form fruste variant of chronic myeloid leukaemia.",
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T2 - Morphometric evidence for the transition from essential thrombocythaemia to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation

AU - Pajor, L.

AU - Kereskai, L.

AU - Zsdrál, K.

AU - Nagy, Z.

AU - Vass, J. A.

AU - Jáksó, P.

AU - Radványi, G.

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Aims: The incidence, bone marrow morphology and genetic features of bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia were investigated. Methods and results: Sixty-four consecutive patients meeting the criteria of essential thrombocythaemia have been investigated for bcr-abl rearrangement and chimera mRNA expression. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated bcr-abl expression in six patients, in two of whom large fraction of the blood and bone marrow cells proved to be positive for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and conventional cytogenetic analysis. In the remaining four patients FISH analysis could not detect Ph+ cells among the blood cells, but in one of these four patients conventional cytogenetic analysis indicated a very small fraction (2%) of Ph+ mitoses in the bone marrow (bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients). In three of these four patients, X-chromosome-linked clonality assay showed that the disease is of uncommitted stem cell origin. During an average of 57 month long follow-up no transformation to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of disease or acceleration/blastic crisis could be observed in the four bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients. They did not differ significantly from typical essential thrombocythaemia patients in quantitative indices of bone marrow cellularity or the size of megakaryocytes. In these two parameters as well as in the total nucleolus organizer region area per nucleus, however, significant differences could be detected between these four as well as typical chronic myeloid leukaemia patients. Statistical analysis of the morphometric data obtained from all six Ph+ and bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients combined indicated a shift of the bone marrow morphology towards the chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation. Conclusions: These investigations indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia is infrequent among essential thrombocythaemia patients, and this condition resembles essential thrombocythaemia more than chronic myeloid leukaemia. Various expansions of the Ph+ clone appear to lead to either essential thrombocythaemia or, rather, chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation; however, data in the present study do not indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia would be a form fruste variant of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

AB - Aims: The incidence, bone marrow morphology and genetic features of bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia were investigated. Methods and results: Sixty-four consecutive patients meeting the criteria of essential thrombocythaemia have been investigated for bcr-abl rearrangement and chimera mRNA expression. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated bcr-abl expression in six patients, in two of whom large fraction of the blood and bone marrow cells proved to be positive for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and conventional cytogenetic analysis. In the remaining four patients FISH analysis could not detect Ph+ cells among the blood cells, but in one of these four patients conventional cytogenetic analysis indicated a very small fraction (2%) of Ph+ mitoses in the bone marrow (bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients). In three of these four patients, X-chromosome-linked clonality assay showed that the disease is of uncommitted stem cell origin. During an average of 57 month long follow-up no transformation to chronic myeloid leukaemia type of disease or acceleration/blastic crisis could be observed in the four bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients. They did not differ significantly from typical essential thrombocythaemia patients in quantitative indices of bone marrow cellularity or the size of megakaryocytes. In these two parameters as well as in the total nucleolus organizer region area per nucleus, however, significant differences could be detected between these four as well as typical chronic myeloid leukaemia patients. Statistical analysis of the morphometric data obtained from all six Ph+ and bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia patients combined indicated a shift of the bone marrow morphology towards the chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation. Conclusions: These investigations indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia is infrequent among essential thrombocythaemia patients, and this condition resembles essential thrombocythaemia more than chronic myeloid leukaemia. Various expansions of the Ph+ clone appear to lead to either essential thrombocythaemia or, rather, chronic myeloid leukaemia type of myeloproliferation; however, data in the present study do not indicate that bcr+ essential thrombocythaemia would be a form fruste variant of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

KW - Bcr-abl

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KW - Myeloproliferative disorders

KW - Philadelphia chromosome

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