Phagocytosis of cells dying through autophagy evokes a pro-inflammatory response in macrophages

Goran Petrovski, Gábor Zahuczky, Gyöngyike Májai, László Fésüs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autophagy as a natural part of cellular homeostasis usually takes place unnoticed by neighboring cells. However, its co-occurrence with cell death may contribute to the clearance of these dying cells by recruited phagocytes. Autophagy associated with programmed cell death has recently been reported to be essential for presentation of phoshatidylserine (PS) on the cell surface (Qu et al. 2007) that has a key role in the clearance of apoptotic cells. Recently, we have demonstrated that upon triggering cell death by autophagy in MCF-7 cells, the corpses were efficiently phagocytosed by both human macrophages and non-dying MCF-7 cells. Death as well as engulfment could be prevented by inhibiting autophagy. Based on our data, two molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the uptake of cells which die through autophagy: a PS-dependent pathway which was exclusively used by the living MCF-7 cells acting as non-professional phagocytes, and a PS-independent uptake mechanism that was active in macrophages acting as professional phagocytes. Several lines of evidence suggest that macrophages utilize calreticulin-mediated recognition, tethering, tickling and engulfment processes. Phagocytic uptake of cells dying through autophagy by macrophages leads to a pro-inflammatory response characterized by the induction and secretion of IL-6, TNFα, IL-8 and IL-10.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-511
Number of pages3
JournalAutophagy
Volume3
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Cytophagocytosis
Autophagy
Macrophages
Phagocytes
MCF-7 Cells
Cell Death
Calreticulin
Interleukin-8
Cadaver
Phagocytosis
Interleukin-10
Interleukin-6
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • Autophagy
  • Calreticulin
  • Cell death
  • Phagocytosis
  • Pro-inflammatory response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Phagocytosis of cells dying through autophagy evokes a pro-inflammatory response in macrophages. / Petrovski, Goran; Zahuczky, Gábor; Májai, Gyöngyike; Fésüs, László.

In: Autophagy, Vol. 3, No. 5, 09.2007, p. 509-511.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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