PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator

R. B. Firestone, G. A. English, D. L. Perry, J. P. Reijonen, F. M. Gicquel, S. Basunia, K. N. Leung, G. F. Garabedian, B. B. Bandong, G. Molnár, L. Szentmiklósi, Zs Révay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) at nuclear reactors has undergone a renaissance with the advent of modern spectroscopy equipment, development of a precise database for PGAA analysis, and the development of guided neutron beams and remote target facilities far from the reactor core. PGAA at these facilities is complemented by short-lived Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) because decay gamma rays are observed either simultaneously with prompt gamma rays or separately if the neutron beam is chopped. Activities with half-lives as short as 1 ms can now be analyzed with NAA. Sensitivity of less than 0.1 mg/g of any element except Helium has been achieved with a 10 6 ncm -2s -1 thermal neutron beam. This kind of analysis has so far been limited to a handful of reactor facilities around the world. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) we are developing a PGAA/NAA analysis system based on a compact, low power, ≈4×10 9 n/s D+D (E n≈2.5 MeV) neutron generator. The generator creates minimal gamma-ray background so detectors can be placed close to the target where the neutron flux is comparable to the guided neutron beam at a reactor. A D+D generator requires less thickness of moderator to thermalize neutrons than a conventional D+T (E n≈14 MeV) generator and eliminates the environmental and political concerns raised by using tritium. This paper discusses our initial PGAA/NAA experimental results for the LBNL neutron generator and future plans to develop reactor-quality PGAA/NAA analysis in the laboratory.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance
Pages940-945
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2003
EventSixth International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology (AccApp'03): Accelerator Applications in a Nuclear Renaissance - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 1 2003Jun 5 2003

Other

OtherSixth International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology (AccApp'03): Accelerator Applications in a Nuclear Renaissance
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period6/1/036/5/03

Fingerprint

Activation analysis
Neutron activation analysis
Neutron beams
Neutrons
Gamma rays
Moderators
Neutron flux
Reactor cores
Tritium
Nuclear reactors
Helium
Spectroscopy
Detectors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Firestone, R. B., English, G. A., Perry, D. L., Reijonen, J. P., Gicquel, F. M., Basunia, S., ... Révay, Z. (2003). PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator. In International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance (pp. 940-945)

PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator. / Firestone, R. B.; English, G. A.; Perry, D. L.; Reijonen, J. P.; Gicquel, F. M.; Basunia, S.; Leung, K. N.; Garabedian, G. F.; Bandong, B. B.; Molnár, G.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Révay, Zs.

International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance. 2003. p. 940-945.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Firestone, RB, English, GA, Perry, DL, Reijonen, JP, Gicquel, FM, Basunia, S, Leung, KN, Garabedian, GF, Bandong, BB, Molnár, G, Szentmiklósi, L & Révay, Z 2003, PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator. in International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance. pp. 940-945, Sixth International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology (AccApp'03): Accelerator Applications in a Nuclear Renaissance, San Diego, CA, United States, 6/1/03.
Firestone RB, English GA, Perry DL, Reijonen JP, Gicquel FM, Basunia S et al. PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator. In International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance. 2003. p. 940-945
Firestone, R. B. ; English, G. A. ; Perry, D. L. ; Reijonen, J. P. ; Gicquel, F. M. ; Basunia, S. ; Leung, K. N. ; Garabedian, G. F. ; Bandong, B. B. ; Molnár, G. ; Szentmiklósi, L. ; Révay, Zs. / PGAA/NAA analysis with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) D+D neutron generator. International Meeting on Nuclear Applications of Accelerator Technology: Accelerator Application in a Nuclear Renaissance. 2003. pp. 940-945
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AU - Gicquel, F. M.

AU - Basunia, S.

AU - Leung, K. N.

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