Növényvédőszer-maradék vizsgálata magyarországon 1967 és 2015 között

Translated title of the contribution: Pesticide residue analysis in Hungary between 1967 and 2015

A. Ámbrus, Adrien Vásárhelyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Around the same time of the development of modern large scale plant protection, exemplary even on an international level, it became necessary to check pesticide residue concentrations in treated crops, soils and surface waters. OÉTI methods were continuously improved by the young, well-trained and enthusiastic staff of the testing laboratories equipped with state-of-the-art instruments, and procedures satisfying the needs of wide ranging analytical tasks were developed, as a result of which a four-volume integrated method collection was already published in 1976, and from 1978 analytical results were already processed and evaluated with the help of computers. By regular training courses and by prescribing strict quality assurance requirements, we ensured that the results of the 20 testing laboratories were comparable. For the staff of a network, having such a methodological background and this high level professional knowledge, it was not a problem to obtain accreditation, in accordance with international requirements, according to the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) and standard ISO 17025, and then to participate outstandingly in international conferences and proficiency testing schemes after joining the European Union. However, the economic state of the country did not allow for a large number of testing laboratories to be maintained. Concentration of the analyses and operating a smaller number of laboratories but with larger staffs were also justified by the optimal utilization of high performance, expensive instruments. Reduction in the number of laboratories started at the beginning of the 90’s, and currently there are 4 laboratories with 37 employees, performing the pesticide residue content inspection of nearly six to seven thousand samples of foods and feeds of animal or plant origin, and also a limited number of analyses investigating environmental pollutions. Analytical requirements are continuously becoming stricter. Today, a pesticide residue testing laboratory is expected to analyze samples for the residues of 400-500 different pesticides and their toxic metabolites, within days. These expectations can only be met by using state-of-the-art instruments and, in this respect, we are seriously lagging behind. Following the instrument purchases and training courses held in 2008 within the framework of the EU transition facility programme, substantial purchases and organized training courses were very limited or non-existent. Replacement of the instruments that are 9 to 16 years old being at the very end of their expected life span, and regular training of the staff that, fortunately, consists mainly of young people, thus ensuring continuity, are necessary without delay for laboratories to be able to perform the control inspections essential for the realization of food safety objectives, satisfying EU requirements.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)918-943
Number of pages26
JournalElelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek
Volume62
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Pesticide Residues
Hungary
pesticide residues
education programs
testing
food safety objective
Environmental Pollution
food animals
Food Safety
Accreditation
Poisons
plant protection
European Union
human resources
quality control
Pesticides
surface water
pesticides
pollution
soil water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Növényvédőszer-maradék vizsgálata magyarországon 1967 és 2015 között. / Ámbrus, A.; Vásárhelyi, Adrien.

In: Elelmiszervizsgalati Kozlemenyek, Vol. 62, No. 1, 2016, p. 918-943.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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