Permanent, bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in the rat

A model for chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-related neurodegenerative diseases

E. Farkas, Paul G M Luiten, F. Bari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

432 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been associated with cognitive decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the pattern of cerebral blood flow in mild cognitive impairment has emerged as a predictive marker for the progression into Alzheimer's disease. The reconstruction of a pathological condition in animal models is a suitable approach to the unraveling of causal relationships. For this reason, permanent, bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO) in rats has been established as a procedure to investigate the effects of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive dysfunction and neurodegenerative processes. Over the years, the 2VO model has generated a large amount of data, revealing the 2VO-related pattern of cerebral hypoperfusion and metabolic changes, learning and memory disturbances, failure of neuronal signaling, and the neuropathological changes in the hippocampus. In addition, the model has been introduced in research into ischemic white matter injury and ischemic eye disease. The present survey sets out to provide a comprehensive summary of the achievements made with the 2VO model, and a critical evaluation and integration of the various results, and to relate the experimental data to human diseases. The data that have accumulated from use of the 2VO model in the rat permit an understanding of the causative role played by cerebral hypoperfusion in neurodegenerative diseases. Thorough characterization of the model suggests that 2VO in the rat is suitable for the development of potentially neuroprotective strategies in neurodegenerative diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-180
Number of pages19
JournalBrain Research Reviews
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

Common Carotid Artery
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Alzheimer Disease
Eye Diseases
Learning Disorders
Hippocampus
Animal Models
Wounds and Injuries
Research
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Carotid occlusion
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Hippocampus
  • Learning
  • Rat
  • White matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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