Periocular dermatitis

A report of 401 patients

E. Temesvári, G. Pónyai, I. Németh, B. Hidvégi, A. Sas, S. Kárpáti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Periocular contact dermatitis may appear as contact conjunctivitis, contact allergic and/or irritative eyelid and periorbital dermatitis, or a combination of these symptoms. The clinical symptoms may be induced by several environmental and therapeutic contact allergens. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to map the eliciting contact allergens in 401 patients with periocular dermatitis (PD) by patch testing with environmental and ophthalmic contact allergens. Methods: Following the methodics of international requirements, 401 patients were tested with contact allergens of the standard environmental series, 133 of 401 patients with the Brial ophthalmic basic and supplementary series as well. Results: Contact hypersensitivity was detected in 34.4% of the patients. Highest prevalence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms (51.18%), in patients of PD associated with ophthalmic complaints (OC; 30.4%), and PD associated with atopic dermatitis (AD; 27.9%). In the subgroup of PD associated with seborrhoea (S) and rosacea (R), contact hypersensitivity was confirmed in 17.6%. Most frequent sensitisers were nickel sulphate (in 8.9% of the tested 401 patients), fragrance mix I (4.5%), balsam of Peru (4.0%), paraphenylendiamine (PPD) (3.7%), and thiomersal (3.5%). By testing ophthalmic allergens, contact hypersensitivity was observed in nine patients (6.7% of the tested 133 patients). The most common confirmed ophthalmic allergens were cocamidopropyl betaine, idoxuridine, phenylephrine hydrochloride, Na chromoglycinate, and papaine. Limitations: Patients with symptoms of PD were tested from 1996 to 2006. Conclusions: The occurence of contact hypersensitivity in PD patients was in present study 34.4%. A relatively high occurence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms, in PD + OC and in PD + AD patients. The predominance of environmental contact allergens was remarkable: most frequent sensitizers were nickel sulphate, fragrance mix I, balsam of Peru, thiomersal, and PPD. The prevalence of contact hypersensitivity to ophthalmic allergens did not exceed l.5%.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-128
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Perioral Dermatitis
Allergens
Contact Dermatitis
Thimerosal
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Idoxuridine
Rosacea
Allergic Conjunctivitis
Phenylephrine
Dermatitis
Eyelids
Atopic Dermatitis

Keywords

  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Contact allergens
  • Periocular dermatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Periocular dermatitis : A report of 401 patients. / Temesvári, E.; Pónyai, G.; Németh, I.; Hidvégi, B.; Sas, A.; Kárpáti, S.

In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, Vol. 23, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 124-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Temesvári, E. ; Pónyai, G. ; Németh, I. ; Hidvégi, B. ; Sas, A. ; Kárpáti, S. / Periocular dermatitis : A report of 401 patients. In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology. 2009 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 124-128.
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N2 - Background: Periocular contact dermatitis may appear as contact conjunctivitis, contact allergic and/or irritative eyelid and periorbital dermatitis, or a combination of these symptoms. The clinical symptoms may be induced by several environmental and therapeutic contact allergens. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to map the eliciting contact allergens in 401 patients with periocular dermatitis (PD) by patch testing with environmental and ophthalmic contact allergens. Methods: Following the methodics of international requirements, 401 patients were tested with contact allergens of the standard environmental series, 133 of 401 patients with the Brial ophthalmic basic and supplementary series as well. Results: Contact hypersensitivity was detected in 34.4% of the patients. Highest prevalence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms (51.18%), in patients of PD associated with ophthalmic complaints (OC; 30.4%), and PD associated with atopic dermatitis (AD; 27.9%). In the subgroup of PD associated with seborrhoea (S) and rosacea (R), contact hypersensitivity was confirmed in 17.6%. Most frequent sensitisers were nickel sulphate (in 8.9% of the tested 401 patients), fragrance mix I (4.5%), balsam of Peru (4.0%), paraphenylendiamine (PPD) (3.7%), and thiomersal (3.5%). By testing ophthalmic allergens, contact hypersensitivity was observed in nine patients (6.7% of the tested 133 patients). The most common confirmed ophthalmic allergens were cocamidopropyl betaine, idoxuridine, phenylephrine hydrochloride, Na chromoglycinate, and papaine. Limitations: Patients with symptoms of PD were tested from 1996 to 2006. Conclusions: The occurence of contact hypersensitivity in PD patients was in present study 34.4%. A relatively high occurence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms, in PD + OC and in PD + AD patients. The predominance of environmental contact allergens was remarkable: most frequent sensitizers were nickel sulphate, fragrance mix I, balsam of Peru, thiomersal, and PPD. The prevalence of contact hypersensitivity to ophthalmic allergens did not exceed l.5%.

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