Peri, pre and postnatal morphine exposure: Exposure-induced effects and sex differences in the behavioural consequences in rat offspring

Julia Timár, Melinda Sobor, Kornél P. Király, Susanna Gyarmati, Pál Riba, Mahmoud Al-Khrasani, Susanna Fürst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the behavioural consequences of peri, pre and postnatal morphine (MO) exposure in rats. From gestational day 1 dams were treated with either saline or MO subcutaneously once a day (5mg/kg on the first 2 days, 10mg/kg subsequently). Spontaneous locomotor activity in a new environment (habituation) and antinociceptive effects of MO were measured separately in male and female pups after weaning and also in late adolescence or adulthood. The rewarding effect of MO was assessed by conditioned place preference in adult animals. Both exposure-induced and sex differences were observed. A significant delay in habituation to a new environment and decreased sensitivity to the antinociceptive effect of MO were found in male offspring of MO-treated dams. In contrast, the place preference induced by MO was enhanced in the MO-exposed adult animals and this effect was more marked in females. Prenatal exposure to MO resulted in more marked changes than the postnatal exposure through maternal milk. The results indicate that a medium MO dose administered once-daily results in long-term consequences in offspring and may make them more vulnerable to MO abuse in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-68
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2010

Keywords

  • Antinociception
  • Conditioned place preference
  • Morphine exposure
  • Offspring
  • Perinatal
  • Rat
  • Sex differences
  • Tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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